A password will be e-mailed to you.

From Tanning to Smoking: More Traits Associated With Our Neanderthal DNA

Summary: Our moods, sleeping patterns, smoking status and how easily we tan may be traced back to our Neanderthal DNA, Max Planck Institute researchers report.

Source: Max Planck Institute.

Neandertal DNA influences variation in skin tone and hair colour in people living today.

After humans and Neandertals met many thousands of years ago, the two species began interbreeding. While Neandertals aren’t around anymore, about two percent of the DNA in non-African people living today comes from them. Recent studies have shown that some of those Neandertal genes have contributed to human immunity and modern diseases. Now researchers have found that our Neandertal inheritance has contributed to other characteristics, too, including skin tone, hair colour, sleep patterns, mood, and even a person’s smoking status.

Inspired by an earlier study that found associations between Neandertal DNA and disease risk, Janet Kelso at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany says her team got interested in exploring connections between Neandertal DNA and characteristics unrelated to disease. Because Neandertal alleles are relatively rare, the researchers needed data representing a really large number of people. They found what they were looking for in data representing more than 112,000 participants in the UK Biobank pilot study. The database includes genetic information along with information on many traits related to physical appearance, diet, sun exposure, behaviour, and disease.

“We can now show that it is skin tone, and the ease with which one tans, as well as hair colour that are affected,” Kelso said. The researchers observe multiple different Neandertal alleles contributing to skin and hair tones. What they found somewhat surprising is that some Neandertal alleles were found in association with lighter skin tones and others with darker skin tones. The same was true for hair colour. “These findings suggest that Neandertals might have differed in their hair and skin tones, much as people now do,” adds Michael Dannemann, first author of the study.

Image shows someone drilling a bone fragment for DNA analysis.

Bone fragment drilling: Researchers need only tiny amounts of bone powder for DNA-analysis. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Frank Vinken.

Furthermore the researcher noticed that Neandertal DNA also influences traits like mood, smoking behaviour and sleep patterns. For example, people with particular Neandertal variants tend to be smokers more often, while other Neandertal DNA is found more frequently in “night people”. Kelso notes that many of the traits influenced by Neandertal DNA, including skin and hair pigmentation, mood, and sleeping patterns are linked to sunlight exposure. When modern humans arrived in Eurasia about 100,000 years ago, Neandertals had already lived there for thousands of years. They were likely well adapted to lower and more variable levels of ultraviolet radiation from the sun compared to the new human arrivals from Africa.

“Skin and hair colour, circadian rhythms and mood are all influenced by light exposure,” the researchers wrote. “We speculate that their identification in our analysis suggests that sun exposure may have shaped Neandertal phenotypes and that gene flow into modern humans continues to contribute to variation in these traits today.”

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Sandra Jacob – Max Planck Institute
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Frank Vinken.
Original Research: Full open access research for “The Contribution of Neanderthals to Phenotypic Variation in Modern Humans” by Michael Dannemann and Janet Kelso in The American Journal of Human Genetics. Published online October 5 2017 doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.09.010

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Max Planck Institute “From Tanning to Smoking: More Traits Associated With Our Neanderthal DNA.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 6 October 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/neanderthal-dna-traits-7680/>.
Max Planck Institute (2017, October 6). From Tanning to Smoking: More Traits Associated With Our Neanderthal DNA. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved October 6, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/neanderthal-dna-traits-7680/
Max Planck Institute “From Tanning to Smoking: More Traits Associated With Our Neanderthal DNA.” http://neurosciencenews.com/neanderthal-dna-traits-7680/ (accessed October 6, 2017).

Abstract

The Contribution of Neanderthals to Phenotypic Variation in Modern Humans

Assessing the genetic contribution of Neanderthals to non-disease phenotypes in modern humans has been difficult because of the absence of large cohorts for which common phenotype information is available. Using baseline phenotypes collected for 112,000 individuals by the UK Biobank, we can now elaborate on previous findings that identified associations between signatures of positive selection on Neanderthal DNA and various modern human traits but not any specific phenotypic consequences. Here, we show that Neanderthal DNA affects skin tone and hair color, height, sleeping patterns, mood, and smoking status in present-day Europeans. Interestingly, multiple Neanderthal alleles at different loci contribute to skin and hair color in present-day Europeans, and these Neanderthal alleles contribute to both lighter and darker skin tones and hair color, suggesting that Neanderthals themselves were most likely variable in these traits.

“The Contribution of Neanderthals to Phenotypic Variation in Modern Humans” by Michael Dannemann and Janet Kelso in The American Journal of Human Genetics. Published online October 5 2017 doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.09.010

Feel free to share this Neuroscience News.
Join our Newsletter
Sign up to receive the latest neuroscience headlines and summaries sent to your email daily from NeuroscienceNews.com
We hate spam. Your email address will not be sold or shared with anyone else.
No more articles