neurotech

This shows the rat's brain scans

A rat had basically no brain, but it could still see, hear, smell, and feel

Rat R222 was born with hydrocephalus. Neuroimaging revealed most of its brain had compressed and collapsed as it filled with fluid. However, despite its condition, the animal was still able to see, hear, smell, and feel like other animals. The study sheds new light on neuroplasticity, and the findings could have implications for the development of new machine learning technologies.... Read More...
This shows part of the brain map

Google and Janelia researchers unveil biggest, most detailed map of the fly brain to date

FlyEM, a team of scientists from Google and the Janelia Research Campus at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has released the most complete map of the fly brain ever created. The map pinpoints millions of connections between 25,000 neurons. The researchers have made the data free online, along with all of the tools necessary to use it.... Read More...
This shows a sea star on a beach

Findings about sea star locomotion could aid in development of simpler, decentralized systems in robotics

Much of a sea star's locomotion is determined by local sensory-motor response at the tube feet level as opposed to global sensory-motor commands. It appears the nervous system relies on the physics of the interaction between the body and the environment to control movement. The findings will help with the development of new robotic systems that utilize a decentralized component to learn hierarchically.... Read More...