Schizophrenia

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Large survey suggests schizophrenia less prevalent than textbooks say

A systematic review of medical literature reveals schizophrenia is overall less common than previously thought. Researchers say the 0.5% estimate for lifetime prevalence of schizophrenia, often reported in textbooks, is significantly overestimated. Additional findings from the review were that schizophrenia is more prevalent in developed countries than poorer countries, and immigrants have higher rates of schizophrenia diagnoses than native-born people.... Read More...
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Genes associated with left-handedness linked with shape of the brain’s language regions

Four genetic regions have been identified as playing a role in left-handedness. Three of the four genes were associated with proteins involved in brain development and structure. Neuroimaging revealed those who were left-handed had increased functional connectivity between left and right language networks. Researchers also found correlations between the genetic regions associated with left-handedness and slightly reduced Parkinson's risk, but a slightly increased risk for schizophrenia.... Read More...
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The neurobiological mechanisms behind schizophrenia may depend on gender

Schizophrenia is linked to alterations in pathways associated with glycosaminoglycan, neurotransmitter metabolism, and GABAergic synapses. A large percentage of genes related to schizophrenia are expressed differently between males and females. The results imply the mechanisms involved in schizophrenia development differ, at least slightly, between males and females.... Read More...
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Is it autism? The line is getting increasingly blurry

A new meta-analysis of autism data reveals the difference between people diagnosed with autism and the general population is shrinking. Measurable differences between people with ASD and people not on the spectrum has decreased over the past 50 years. Researchers say the definition of autism may be getting too blurry to be meaningful, and the condition may be at risk of being trivialized.... Read More...