A password will be e-mailed to you.

Savory Foods May Promote Healthy Eating Through Effects on the Brain

Summary: Researchers report consuming a savory broth can produce subtle neurobiological changes that promotes healthy eating behaviors and food choices.

Source: BIDMC.

Researchers have found that consuming a broth rich in umami–or savory taste–can cause subtle changes in the brain that promote healthy eating behaviors and food choices, especially in women at risk of obesity.

Umami is a Japanese word to express a delicious, savory meal, and it represents one of the five basic tastes, together with sweet, salty, bitter, and sour. A key component of umami taste is glutamate, a naturally occurring non-essential amino acid that can be found in nearly all foods, and especially in foods high in protein such as dairy products, fish, and meat.

Previous experimental studies have shown that intake of a broth or soup supplemented with monosodium glutamate (MSG), a sodium salt of glutamate, prior to a meal can decrease appetite and food intake, especially in women with a propensity to overeat and gain weight. In a study published March 30 in Neuropsychopharmacology, researchers evaluated changes in the brains of healthy young women after they consumed chicken broth with or without MSG added.

The investigators used three laboratory tools to detect changes: a computer test that measured inhibitory control (a key mental process that is necessary for self-regulation of eating), a buffet meal during which participants ate freely while wearing special glasses that tracked eye movements, and a functional brain scan that measured brain activity while participants made food choices.

Following intake of the umami-rich broth, participants performed the inhibitory control test better, had more focused gazes during the meal, and had more engagement of a brain area that is linked to successful self-regulation during food choice. Also, after consuming the umami-rich broth, those at higher risk of obesity consumed less saturated fat during the meal.

an egg on avocado toast

Umami is a Japanese word to express a delicious, savory meal, and it represents one of the five basic tastes, together with sweet, salty, bitter, and sour. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

“Previous research in humans studied the effects of umami broths on appetite, which is typically assessed with subjective measures. Here, we extended these findings replicating the beneficial effects of umami on healthy eating in women at higher risk of obesity, and we used new laboratory measures that are sensitive and objective,” said senior author Miguel Alonso-Alonso, MD, PhD, an Assistant Professor at the Center for the Study of Nutrition Medicine in BIDMC’s Department of Surgery, BIDMC. He also noted that much research has examined the effects of sugar and sweetness on the brain, but the study of savory taste has been limited.

The results may open new ways to facilitate healthy eating and reduce food intake in the general population. “Many cultures around the world advocate drinking a broth before a meal. Our study suggests the possibility that people at high risk of obesity could benefit from an umami-rich broth before a meal to facilitate healthy eating and healthy food choice,” said Alonso-Alonso. “However, here we only evaluated immediate effects and in a laboratory context. Future research should address whether these observed changes can accumulate and affect food intake over time and/or whether they can be leveraged to help people lose weight more successfully.”

About this neuroscience research article

Funding: This study was supported by a grant from Ajinomoto Inc., which had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article, and the Harvard Catalyst/Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (8UL1TR000170-05 and 1UL1TR001102-01).

Source: Jacqueline Mitchell – BIDMC
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Abstract for “Neurocognitive effects of umami: association with eating behavior and food choice” by Greta Magerowski, Gabrielle Giacona, Laura Patriarca, Konstantinos Papadopoulos, Paola Garza-Naveda, Joanna Radziejowska & Miguel Alonso-Alonso in Neuropsychopharmacology. Published March 20 2018.
doi:10.1038/s41386-018-0044-6

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
BIDMC”Savory Foods May Promote Healthy Eating Through Effects on the Brain.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 6 July 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/savory-healthy-eating-9529/>.
BIDMC(2018, July 6). Savory Foods May Promote Healthy Eating Through Effects on the Brain. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved July 6, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/savory-healthy-eating-9529/
BIDMC”Savory Foods May Promote Healthy Eating Through Effects on the Brain.” http://neurosciencenews.com/savory-healthy-eating-9529/ (accessed July 6, 2018).

Abstract

Neurocognitive effects of umami: association with eating behavior and food choice

Free glutamate, a key substance underlying the umami taste of foods, fulfills a number of physiological functions related to energy balance. Previous experimental studies have shown that intake of a broth or soup supplemented with monosodium glutamate (MSG) prior to a meal can decrease appetite and food intake, particularly in women with propensity to overeat and gain weight. In this study, we examined potential neurocognitive mechanisms underlying this effect. We evaluated changes after intake of a chicken broth with or without MSG added (MSG+/MSG−) in a sample of healthy young women. Subjects were assessed with a food-modified computerized inhibitory control task, a buffet meal test with eye-tracking, and brain responses during a food choice paradigm evaluated with functional neuroimaging. We found evidence for improvement in key parameters related to inhibitory control following intake of the MSG+ broth, particularly in subjects with high levels of eating disinhibition, who also showed lower intake of saturated fat during the meal. Additionally, consumption of the MSG+ broth led to a reduction of the rate of fixation switches between plates at the meal, and increased engagement of a brain region in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex previously associated with successful self-control during dietary decisions. Altogether, these results, while preliminary, suggest potential facilitating effects of glutamate (MSG) on cognitive executive processes that are relevant for the support of healthy eating behaviors and food choice.

Feel free to share this Neuroscience News.
Join our Newsletter
I agree to have my personal information transferred to AWeber for Neuroscience Newsletter ( more information )
Sign up to receive the latest neuroscience headlines and summaries sent to your email daily from NeuroscienceNews.com
We hate spam and only use your email to contact you about newsletters. We do not sell email addresses. You can cancel your subscription any time.
No more articles