Parkinson’s disease

This shows the outline of two bodies. One has the head highlighted red, the other has the gut highlighted red

Where does Parkinson’s disease start? In the brain or gut? Or both?

Lewy body disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia, comprise of two distinct subtypes. One subtype originates in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the gut and spreads to the brain. The other originates in the brain, or enters the brain via the olfactory system, before spreading to the brainstem and PNS.... Read More...
This shows left hands

Genes associated with left-handedness linked with shape of the brain’s language regions

Four genetic regions have been identified as playing a role in left-handedness. Three of the four genes were associated with proteins involved in brain development and structure. Neuroimaging revealed those who were left-handed had increased functional connectivity between left and right language networks. Researchers also found correlations between the genetic regions associated with left-handedness and slightly reduced Parkinson's risk, but a slightly increased risk for schizophrenia.... Read More...
This is a drawing of the intestines

Parkinson’s disease may originate in the intestines

Two months after injecting alpha-synuclein into the intestines of rats, researchers discovered the proteins had traveled to the brain via peripheral nerves. Four months later, the pathology was greater. Additionally, the protein had traveled to the heart. The study supports the hypothesis that Parkinson's disease may begin in the intestinal system before migrating to the brain. ... Read More...