Autism health challenges could be explained by problem behaviors

Summary: A new study explores the relationship between problem behaviors associated with autism and gastrointestinal symptoms. Findings suggest younger children on the autism spectrum with aggressive problem behaviors are 11.2% more likely to have co-occurring nausea, whereas older children with ASD had more complex relationships between internalizing symptoms and GI problems.

Source: University of Missouri-Columbia

For years, researchers have documented both gastrointestinal issues and problematic behaviors, such as aggression, in many children with autism spectrum disorder.

Researchers from the University of Missouri have now found that both internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors might indicate gastrointestinal distress in children and adolescents with autism.

Bradley Ferguson, assistant research professor in the departments of health psychology, radiology, and the Thompson Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders, examined records from 340 children and adolescents with autism who are patients at the Thompson Center. Ferguson found that 65% of patients experienced constipation, nearly half experienced stomach pain, nearly 30% experienced diarrhea and 23% experienced nausea. Furthermore, some of these gastrointestinal symptoms were associated with different behaviors, such as anxiety and aggression.

“We are starting to better understand how gastrointestinal issues coincide with problem behaviors in ASD,” Ferguson said. “For example, we found that individuals with autism and co-occurring nausea were about 11% more likely to display aggressive behaviors. Therefore, addressing nausea might alleviate the aggressive behaviors which will ultimately increase the quality of life for the patient as well as their family.”

One in 59 children in the United States is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Since the developmental disorder can affect an individual’s social skills, speech, and nonverbal communication, it can be difficult for those with the disorder to adequately communicate other health challenges, such as gastrointestinal discomfort.

This shows a head and speech bubbles

One in 59 children in the United States is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Since the developmental disorder can affect an individual’s social skills, speech, and nonverbal communication, it can be difficult for those with the disorder to adequately communicate other health challenges, such as gastrointestinal discomfort. The image is in the public domain.

Ferguson and his colleagues also found that the relationship between problem behaviors and gastrointestinal symptoms differed between young children and older children with autism. While aggressive behavior in younger children, aged 2-5, was associated with upper gastrointestinal issues such as nausea and stomach pains, older children, aged 6-18, with greater anxiety were more likely to experience lower gastrointestinal issues such as constipation and diarrhea. Understanding these differences can help shape future treatments for individuals with ASD.

“These findings further highlight the importance of treating gastrointestinal issues in autism,” Ferguson said.

“Many children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder are often unable to verbally communicate their discomfort, which can lead to problem behavior as a means of communicating their discomfort.”

Ferguson noted that since the study is correlational in nature, it is not yet clear if the gastrointestinal symptoms are causing the problem behavior or vice versa.

“Regardless, our team is examining the effects of propranolol, a beta blocker with stress-blocking effects, on constipation and other symptoms. We have to work quickly, because people are suffering and need answers now. We hope that our research will translate to better quality of life,” he said.

Funding: The study was funded by general funds provided to the University of Missouri Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. The Department of Health Psychology is in the MU School of Health Professions, and the Department of Radiology is in the MU School of Medicine.

“The Relationship Among Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Problem Behaviors, and Internalizing Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” was published in Frontiers in Psychiatry. Other MU Thompson Center researchers who contributed to the study include Kristen Dovgan, Nicole Takahashi and David Q. Beversdorf.

About this neuroscience research article

Source:
University of Missouri-Columbia
Media Contacts:
Brian Consiglio – University of Missouri-Columbia
Image Source:
The image is in the public domain.

Original Research: Open access
“The Relationship Among Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Problem Behaviors, and Internalizing Symptoms in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder”. Bradley J. Ferguson, Kristen Dovgan, Nicole Takahashi and David Q. Beversdorf.
Frontiers in Psychiatry. doi:10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00194

Abstract

The Relationship Among Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Problem Behaviors, and Internalizing Symptoms in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Background:
Many individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, but the etiology is poorly understood. These GI symptoms often coincide with problem behaviors and internalizing symptoms, which reduces the quality of life for these individuals.

Methods:
This study examined the relationships among GI problems, problem behaviors, and internalizing symptoms in a sample of 340 children and adolescents with ASD who are patients at the University of Missouri Thompson Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

Results:
The majority of patients experienced constipation (65%), about half experienced stomachaches or stomach pain (47.9%), and others experienced nausea (23.2%) or diarrhea (29.7%). Young children with aggressive problem behaviors were 11.2% more likely to have co-occurring nausea; whereas, older children showed more complex relationships between internalizing symptoms and GI symptoms. Older children with greater anxiety symptoms were 11% more likely to experience constipation, but 9% less likely to experience stomachaches. Older children with greater withdrawn behavior were 10.9% more likely to experience stomachaches, but 8.7% less likely to experience constipation. Older children with greater somatic complaints were 11.4% more likely to experience nausea and 11.5% more likely to experience stomachaches.

Conclusions:
Results suggest that the presentation of externalizing problem behavior and internalizing symptoms associated with GI problems differs between young children and older children with ASD. Therefore, behavior may have different relationships with GI symptoms at different ages, which may have implications for the treatment of and clinical approach to GI disturbances in ASD.

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