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Pacifiers Not to Blame for Common Speech Disorders in Kids

Summary: Contrary to popular belief, researchers find no significant link between common speech disorders and the use of pacifiers or bottles in small children.

Source: University of Sydney.

New University of Sydney research shows bottles, dummies, and thumb sucking in the early years of life do not cause or worsen phonological impairment, the most common type of speech disorder in children.

The study, published in Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, examined the sucking behaviours of 199 Australian pre-schoolers to determine if a child’s history of dummy use, bottle use, breastfeeding or thumb sucking impacted the presence or severity of this common speech disorder.

Lead author Dr Elise Baker said while dummy or pacifier use is a controversial topic, the study suggests they are not associated with the majority of speech problems in children.

“There is a misconception that dummies impact children’s opportunities to learn or practise speech, however our study shows no connection between dummy use in the early years and the presence or severity of the most common type of childhood speech problem,” said speech pathologist Dr Baker from the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Health Sciences.

“The findings suggest that for the majority of children with speech delay the problem is not to do with the mouth, but rather associated with how children learn the sound system of language.”

Dr Baker admits dummies are contentious, with research suggesting both pros and cons to their use.

“Dummies may have benefits such as helping premature babies develop sucking skills, reducing pain during medical procedures, reduced risk of developing allergies and possibly even reduce SIDS risk.”

“On the flip side they have also been associated with gastrointestinal infections, more ear infections, incorrect bite, bowel obstruction and reduced breast-feeding duration among other issues.”

For this study, parents were asked to complete a questionnaire detailing their child’s sucking habits and researchers directly assessed the children’s speech to allow a comparison between those with and without phonological impairment.

Phonological impairment occurs when a child has difficulty with learning how to use speech sounds correctly and in the right context. A child with this disorder might use ‘s’ correctly at the end of a word like ‘bus’ but when faced with words starting with two consonants they might say ‘poon’ for ‘spoon’ and ‘tar’ for ‘star’.

The results of the study showed:

  • 79.9 percent of children had been breastfed (with 1 in 3 of these children breastfeed for more than 12 months);
  • 58.3 percent had used a dummy/pacifier (with 3 in 4 of these children using a dummy/pacifier for 12 months or more)
  • 83.9 percent had used a bottle (with 3 in 4 of these children using a dummy/pacifier for more than 12 months),
  • 15.1 percent sucked their thumb/fingers.

No significant association was found between nutritive or non-nutritive sucking habits and the presence or severity of phonological impairment.

Co-author Dr Sarah Masso said the study doesn’t discount other health and developmental impacts of the prolonged use of a pacifier, dummy or other sucking aid.

a pacifier

No significant association was found between nutritive or non-nutritive sucking habits and the presence or severity of phonological impairment. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

“Furthermore while we have ruled out a link with the most common form of speech disorder, more research is needed to determine if there is any relationship with less common problems such as a lisp,” said Dr Masso from the Faculty of Health Sciences.

How common are speech problems in children?

A recent Australian study identified 3.4 percent of children as having a speech sound disorder at four years of age.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics records approximately 340,000 four and five-years-olds attending a preschool program in 2017. The researchers estimate that around 11,560 of these children would have a speech disorder, with 10,404 likely having the most common type; phonological impairment.

“Without early treatment speech problems have been linked to difficulties with reading and writing, anxiety and mental health problems,” said Dr Masso.

When should parents seek help?

Research shows one in four parents of Australian children are concerned about their four to five-year-old child’s speech but the majority do not act on their concerns.

“Parents should be concerned when an 18-month-old isn’t starting to communicate and use words, or when a two-year-old has less than 50 words and is not putting two words together,” said Dr Baker.

“If a child is four and their speech is still difficult to understand I would certainly suggest parents seek help from a qualified speech pathologist.”

About this neuroscience research article

Funding: The study is a collaboration between the University of Sydney, Charles Sturt University and the University of Bristol (UK), and was supported by funding from the Australian Research Council.

Source: University of Sydney
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Video Source: Video credited to University of Sydney.
Original Research: Abstract for “Pacifiers, Thumb Sucking, Breastfeeding, and Bottle Use: Oral Sucking Habits of Children with and without Phonological Impairment” by Baker E., Masso S., McLeod S., and Wren Y. in Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica. Published September 2018.
doi:10.1159/000492469

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Sydney”Pacifiers Not to Blame for Common Speech Disorders in Kids.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 10 October 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/pacifiers-speech-9999/>.
University of Sydney(2018, October 10). Pacifiers Not to Blame for Common Speech Disorders in Kids. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved October 10, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/pacifiers-speech-9999/
University of Sydney”Pacifiers Not to Blame for Common Speech Disorders in Kids.” http://neurosciencenews.com/pacifiers-speech-9999/ (accessed October 10, 2018).

Abstract

Pacifiers, Thumb Sucking, Breastfeeding, and Bottle Use: Oral Sucking Habits of Children with and without Phonological Impairment

Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the nutritive and non-nutritive oral sucking habits (breastfeeding, bottle use, pacifier/dummy/soother use, thumb/finger sucking) of preschoolers with and without phonological impairment, and to determine whether oral sucking habits are associated with the presence and severity of phonological impairment.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 199 Australian English-speaking preschoolers with and without phonological impairment. Preschoolers’ speech was directly assessed, and parents/caregivers completed a questionnaire. Chi-square (χ2) tests were used to examine relationships between oral sucking habits and the presence and severity of phonological impairment.

Results: Based on caregiver reports, 79.9% of participants had been breastfed (33.3% for >12 months), 58.3% had used a pacifier (74.2% for ≥12 months), 83.9% had used a bottle (73.4% for > 12 months), and 15.1% sucked their thumb/fingers. There was no association between a history of oral sucking and the presence and severity of phonological impairment.

Conclusion: The majority of preschoolers had been breastfed and bottle-fed, and more than half had used a pacifier. The findings support an understanding that phonological impairment is not associated with a history of nutritive and non-nutritive sucking habits. Research is needed to examine the association between oral sucking habits and other types of speech sound disorders.

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