Autism

Research articles covering work related to austism spectrum disorders are provided below.

This shows a heatmap of pfc neurons

Possible link between autism and antidepressants use during pregnancy: Mouse Study

A new study in mice reveals a possible link between the use of SSRI antidepressants during pregnancy and an increased risk of autism-like symptoms in offspring. Offspring exposed to fluoxetine (Prozac) in utero were more likely to exhibit impaired neurotransmission caused by an overactive serotonin receptor in the prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain implicated in modulating social behaviors. However, treating the mice with a compound that blocks the receptor alleviated the behavioral problems and improved working memory.... Read More...
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Study links gene to sleep problems in autism

Deficiencies in the SHANK3 gene have been linked to sleep disruptions in both mouse models and people with ASD. Researchers found patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome, a genetic disorder associated with autism, report trouble falling, and staying asleep. In mouse models, animals lacking the SHANK3 gene had a reduction in deep sleep quality and spent more time awake when other mice were sleeping.... Read More...
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Placental function linked to brain injuries associated with autism

Disruptions in the supply of allopregnanolone, a hormone created by the placenta late in pregnancy, to the developing fetus can leave children more vulnerable to brain injuries associated with ASD. Losing the supply of ALLO alters cerebellar development, an area of the brain critical for motor coordination and social cognition, impacting the post-birth development of cerebellar white matter. An experimental model revealed deficient cerebellar white matter resulted in social impairments and an increase in repetitive behaviors, two hallmark features associated with autism. ... Read More...
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Autism symptoms reduced nearly 50% two years after fecal transplant

Arizona State University researchers claim microbiota transfer therapy reduces symptoms associated with autism and gastrointestinal problems for two years post-treatment. The study suggests MTT may be a promising option for helping to treat children with ASD who also have GI problems. The researchers stress further research, including double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials with a larger cohort be carried out. ... Read More...