A password will be e-mailed to you.

Music May Improve Mood in Adults with Dementia

Summary: According to researchers, musical intervention can help to improve mood and decrease agitation in those with dementia.

Source: Wiley.

In a Geriatrics & Gerontology International study of 51 individuals living with dementia who attended community-based adult day health centers, behavioral observations of a music intervention showed a positive change in mood and a decrease in agitation. Participants demonstrated significant increases in joy, eye contact, eye movement, being engaged, and talkativeness, and a decrease in sleeping and moving or dancing.

For the study, each participant listened to personalized music using headphones, which prompted social interaction with one another and/or the researchers while listening. After 20 minutes, participants were brought back to the center’s usual activities and were observed for 20 more minutes.

a woman listening to music

For the study, each participant listened to personalized music using headphones, which prompted social interaction with one another and/or the researchers while listening. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Geriatrics & Gerontology International.

“The promising results of this affordable and meaningful intervention have propelled our team to develop an online training for direct care workers in long-term care communities,” said lead author Dr. Emily Ihara, of George Mason University. “The ‘Mason Music & Memory Initiative (M3I)’ combines this training with the music intervention and will be implemented in over 100 Virginia nursing facilities over the next three years.”

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Penny Smith – Wiley
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Geriatrics & Gerontology International.
Original Research: Abstract for “Results from a person‐centered music intervention for individuals living with dementia” by Emily S Ihara, Catherine J Tompkins, Megumi Inoue, and Sonya Sonneman in Geriatrics & Gerontology. Published November 20 2018.
doi:10.1111/ggi.13563

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Wiley”Music May Improve Mood in Adults with Dementia.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 21 November 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/music-mood-dementia-10239/>.
Wiley(2018, November 21). Music May Improve Mood in Adults with Dementia. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved November 21, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/music-mood-dementia-10239/
Wiley”Music May Improve Mood in Adults with Dementia.” http://neurosciencenews.com/music-mood-dementia-10239/ (accessed November 21, 2018).

Abstract

Results from a person‐centered music intervention for individuals living with dementia

Aim
Dementia is a chronic, costly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Effective, affordable person‐centered interventions are required to improve the lived experiences of individuals with dementia and their caregivers in various care settings. The present study examined the effects of a person‐centered music listening intervention on mood, agitation and social engagement for individuals living with dementia.

Methods
This quasi‐experimental study was carried out with participants at five community‐based adult day health centers (n = 51). Standardized instruments were used to measure mood and agitation, and in‐person and video‐recorded observations of participant behavior were used to analyze changes before, during and after the intervention across four domains: mood, agitation, connecting to music and engaging socially. Within‐person differences were examined using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, and between‐group differences were examined using the Mann–Whitney U‐test.

Results
Although standardized instruments did not yield statistically significant results, the behavioral observations showed a positive change in mood and a decrease in agitation. From pre‐ to post‐intervention, there were statistically significant increases in joy, eye contact, eye movement, being engaged and talkativeness, and a decrease in sleeping and moving or dancing.

Conclusions
Behavioral observations show the positive impact a person‐centered music listening intervention might have on individuals living with dementia and attending adult day health centers. This affordable intervention provides a useful tool for caregivers that might improve the day‐to‐day experience of individuals living with dementia.

Feel free to share this Neuroscience News.
Join our Newsletter
I agree to have my personal information transferred to AWeber for Neuroscience Newsletter ( more information )
Sign up to receive the latest neuroscience headlines and summaries sent to your email daily from NeuroscienceNews.com
We hate spam and only use your email to contact you about newsletters. We do not sell email addresses. You can cancel your subscription any time.
No more articles