dementia

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Sleeping for too little or too long linked to poorer memory

Sleep duration can have a negative impact on memory skills and reaction time. While the effects of sleep deprivation are well documented, researchers report sleeping for longer than the recommended 7 to 8 hours per night is associated with more errors in memory recall and slower reaction times, with each additional hour of sleep impacting performance more.... Read More...
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As plaque deposits increase in the aging brain, money management falters

Older adults who experience problems completing simple financial tasks, such as calculating their change, may be at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. Problems with financial management have often been associated with later stage dementia. A new study reveals this could be one of the earliest signs of dementia and may be correlated with a build-up of amyloid plaque deposits.... Read More...
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High LDL cholesterol linked to early-onset Alzheimer’s

Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol has been linked to an increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer's disease, in those with and without a genetic risk factor. This suggests cholesterol could be an independent risk factor for dementia. Additionally, researchers identified a potential new genetic risk factor for early-onset Alzheimer's, a rare variant of the APOB gene.... Read More...
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Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice

Study reports specific gut bacteria can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease. In mouse models, long term antibiotic treatment reduced inflammation and the formation of amyloid plaques. However, the reduction was only seen in males. Additionally, the antibiotic treatment altered the activation of microglia in the male mouse models.... Read More...
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Brain changes linked with Alzheimer’s up to 30 years before symptoms appear

Researchers have identified average levels of biological and anatomical brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease over thirty years before symptoms appear. In those with genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's, researchers found changes in cognitive performance up to 15 years before becoming symptomatic. Changes in Tau levels in the cerebral spinal fluid appeared up to 34 years before dementia symptoms occurred, and physical changes to the medial temporal lobe were apparent up to 9 years before cognitive impairment was apparent.... Read More...