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Gene Variant Increases Risk For Depression

Summary: According to researchers, people with the APOE4 gene have a 20% increased risk of developing depression as they age.

Source: University of Central Florida.

A University of Central Florida study has found that a gene variant, thought to be carried by nearly 25 percent of the population, increases the odds of developing depression.

People with apolipoprotein-E4, called ApoE4 for short, have a 20 percent greater chance of developing clinically significant depressive symptoms later in life compared to those who don’t have the gene variant, said Rosanna Scott, lead author of the study published in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. She will present her work at the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics conference in San Francisco next week. Scott, a Ph.D. candidate in clinical psychology, found the link while working on her thesis.

“Some genes are deterministic, like the one that causes Huntington’s disease — where if you’ve got it, you’ll get the disease. This isn’t one of those genes,” said Daniel Paulson, Scott’s faculty advisor and an assistant professor of psychology who co-authored the study.

Scott used health and well-being data of 3,203 participants as they aged from 53 to 71 years old. The data came from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a long-term study of health, relationships, mortality and more of people who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957. Those who have ApoE4 reported more symptoms of depression as they aged.

“Her thesis addressed a critical gap in the theoretical framework of this area of study,” Paulson said. “Now we can more systematically move forward with research on causes and treatments for late-life depression.”

Scott wanted to study ApoE4 and its potential links to depression because this variant of the ApoE gene is also known to negatively impact how a body handles cholesterol. Previous research — and Scott confirmed in the first paper of her thesis published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry — found that vascular-system risk factors such as high cholesterol, hypertension and high blood sugar also increase risk for depression. Vascular burden impacts how blood and nutrients are delivered throughout the body and to the brain, therefore impacting mood. Scott wondered if adults with ApoE4 and high vascular burden are at a compounded risk for depression.

Image shows a DNA strand.

Vascular burden impacts how blood and nutrients are delivered throughout the body and to the brain, therefore impacting mood. Scott wondered if adults with ApoE4 and high vascular burden are at a compounded risk for depression. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only.

Her research concluded that ApoE4 and poor vascular health do not create a compounded risk, but both independently increase the likelihood of depression.

Scott’s findings add clarity to the literature that’s already out in the scientific community on this topic, Paulson said. Prior research findings were inconsistent regarding ApoE4 and its risks for depression, and were done with small sample groups, too young a sample, or with data that wasn’t collected during a long period of time, she said.

Scott aspires to specialize in neuropsychology after completing her Ph.D. She’d like to work in academia to help guide student researchers like herself, and she’d also like to provide neuropsychological assessment and therapy services to the community. She’s particularly interested in chronic health conditions and how they impact mood in older adults.

“Bottom line, you do statistically have a higher risk of developing depression if you have ApoE4, but it’s not deterministic. You can’t change your genes, but you do have some control over improving your health,” she said. “That should be encouraging.”

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Zenaida Gonzalez Kotala – University of Central Florida
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the University of Central Florida news release.
Original Research: Abstract for “Independent Effects of Apolipoprotein E and Cerebrovascular Burden on Later-Life Depression: The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study” by Rosanna G. Scott, MS, and Daniel L. Paulson, PhD in Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. Published online July 2017 doi:10.4088/JCP.16m10913

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Central Florida “Gene Variant Increases Risk For Depression.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 23 July 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/depression-apoe4-genetics-7151/>.
University of Central Florida (2017, July 23). Gene Variant Increases Risk For Depression. NeuroscienceNew. Retrieved July 23, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/depression-apoe4-genetics-7151/
University of Central Florida “Gene Variant Increases Risk For Depression.” http://neurosciencenews.com/depression-apoe4-genetics-7151/ (accessed July 23, 2017).

Abstract

Independent Effects of Apolipoprotein E and Cerebrovascular Burden on Later-Life Depression: The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study

Objective: Studies evaluating the effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) on vascular depression are sparse, employ heterogeneous methods, and yield inconsistent results. One possibility is that APOE is a moderator of another predictor such as cerebrovascular burden. This longitudinal study examines the relationships between APOE, cerebrovascular burden, and depressive symptomatology in a large cohort sample from midlife to later life.

Methods: Data include 3,203 participants across 18 years (1993–2011) from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (baseline mean age = 53 years). Depressive symptomatology was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. Cerebrovascular burden was operationalized as hypertension, high blood sugar or diabetes, and other heart problems. APOE genotyping was completed using saliva samples. Hypotheses were examined via a moderated path model and binary logistic regression.

Results: Results supported the hypothesized path model (root mean square error of approximation = 0.041; comparative fit index = 0.959); however, APOE-conferred risk was not a significant moderator of the 2004 or 2011 vascular depression effect and only approached significance as a predictor of depression in 2011 (P = .079). The logistic regression yielded APOE as a significant predictor of clinically significant depressive symptoms in 2011 (P = .02, Exp(B) = 1.197).

Conclusions: The present findings suggest that APOE may influence expression of depressive symptomatology as adults age into and beyond their mid-70s but do not indicate APOE as a moderator of vascular depression. Results posit a potential explanation for inconsistent past findings.

“Independent Effects of Apolipoprotein E and Cerebrovascular Burden on Later-Life Depression: The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study” by Rosanna G. Scott, MS, and Daniel L. Paulson, PhD in Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. Published online July 2017 doi:10.4088/JCP.16m10913

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