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Lack of Sleep Leads to Obesity in Children and Adolescents

Summary: Researchers have identified a link between short sleep duration in childhood and the development of obesity later in life.

Source: University of Warwick.

Children who get less than the recommended amount of sleep for their age are at a higher risk of developing obesity.

Research at the University of Warwick has found that children and adolescents who regularly sleep less than others of the same age gain more weight when they grow older and are more likely to become overweight or obese.

One of the co-authors, Dr Michelle Miller, Reader of Biochemical Medicine, Health Sciences, Warwick Medical School said: “Being overweight can lead to cardiovascular disease and type-2-diabetes which is also on the increase in children. The findings of the study indicate that sleep may be an important potentially modifiable risk factor (or marker) of future obesity.”

The paper, “Sleep duration and incidence of obesity in infants, children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies”, has been published in the journal Sleep. The paper’s authors reviewed the results of 42 population studies of infants, children and adolescents aged 0 to 18 years which included a total of 75,499 participants. Their average sleep duration was assessed through a variety of methods, from questionnaires to wearable technology.

The participants were grouped into two classifications: short sleeper and regular sleepers. Short sleepers were defined as having less sleep than the reference category for their age. This was based on the most recent National Sleep Foundation guidelines in the U.S. which recommends that infants (4 to 11 months) get between 12-15 hours of nightly sleep, that toddlers (1-2 years) get 11-14 hours of sleep, children in pre-school (3-5 years) get 10-13 hours and school aged children (6-13 years) between 9 and 11 hours. Teenagers (14-17 years) are advised to get 8-10 hours.

Participants were followed up for a median period of three years and changes in BMI and incidences of overweight and/or obesity were recorded over time. At all ages short sleepers gained more weight and overall were 58% more likely to become overweight or obese.

Dr Miller said: “The results showed a consistent relationship across all ages indicating that the increased risk is present in both younger and older children. The study also reinforces the concept that sleep deprivation is an important risk factor for obesity, detectable very early on in life.”

Co-author Professor Francesco Cappuccio added: “By appraising world literature we were able to demonstrate that, despite some variation between studies, there is a strikingly consistent overall prospective association between short sleep and obesity.

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The paper’s authors stress that whilst healthy eating and exercise are important this study demonstrates that getting enough sleep is equally important. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

“This study builds on our previous analysis of cross-sectional data published in 2008. The importance of the latest approach is that only prospective longitudinal studies were included, demonstrating that short sleep precedes the development of obesity in later years, strongly suggesting causality.”

The prevalence of obesity has increased world-wide and the World Health Organization has now declared it a global epidemic. The paper’s authors stress that whilst healthy eating and exercise are important this study demonstrates that getting enough sleep is equally important. They suggest that educational programmes could be used to empower parents and children to maximise their sleep quantity.

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Nicola Jones – University of Warwick
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Abstract for “Sleep duration and incidence of obesity in infants, children, and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies” by Michelle A Miller, Marlot Kruisbrink, Joanne Wallace, Chen Ji, and Francesco P Cappuccio in Sleep. Published February 1 2018.
doi:10.1093/sleep/zsy018

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Warwick “Lack of Sleep Leads to Obesity in Children and Adolescents.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 16 April 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-obesity-teens-8801/>.
University of Warwick (2018, April 16). Lack of Sleep Leads to Obesity in Children and Adolescents. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved April 16, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-obesity-teens-8801/
University of Warwick “Lack of Sleep Leads to Obesity in Children and Adolescents.” http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-obesity-teens-8801/ (accessed April 16, 2018).

Abstract

Sleep duration and incidence of obesity in infants, children, and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies

Study Objectives
To assess the prospective relationship between sleep and obesity in a paediatric population.

Methods
We performed a systematic search using PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane (up to September 25, 2017). Included studies were prospective, had follow-up of ≥1 year, had duration of sleep at baseline, and measures of incidence of overweight or obesity and/or changes in body mass index (BMI) z-score and BMI during follow-up. We extracted relative risks or changes in BMI z-score or BMI and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and pooled them using a random effect model.

Results
Forty-two studies were included but, as there was significant heterogeneity, results are presented by age strata. Short sleep was associated with a greater risk of developing overweight or obesity in infancy (seven studies, 14738 participants, risk ratio [RR]: 1.40; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.65; p < .001), early childhood (eight studies, 31104 participants, RR: 1.57; 1.40 to 1.76; p < .001), middle childhood (three studies, 3005 participants, RR: 2.23; 2.18 to 2.27; p < .001), and adolescence (three studies, 26652 participants, RR: 1.30; 1.11 to 1.53; p < .002). Sleep duration was also associated with a significant change in BMI z-score (14 studies, 18 cohorts, 31665 participants; mean difference −0.03; −0.04 to −0.01 per hour sleep; p = .001) and in BMI (16 studies, 24 cohorts, 24894 participants; mean difference −0.03 kg/m2; −0.04 to −0.01 for every hour of increase in sleep; p = .001)

Conclusions
Short sleep duration is a risk factor or marker of the development of obesity in infants, children, and adolescents.

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