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Anti-Inflammatory Diet Linked to Reduced Risk of Early Death

Summary: Researchers report following an anti-inflammatory diet can help lower the risks of dying from cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Source: Wiley.

Adhering to an anti-inflammatory diet was associated with lower risks of dying from any cause, dying from cardiovascular causes, and dying from cancer in a recent Journal of Internal Medicine study.

In the study of 68,273 Swedish men and women aged 45 to 83 years who were followed for 16 years, participants who most closely followed an anti-inflammatory diet had an 18% lower risk of all-cause mortality, a 20% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality, and a 13% lower risk of cancer mortality, when compared with those who followed the diet to a lesser degree. Smokers who followed the diet experienced even greater benefits when compared with smokers who did not follow the diet.

Anti-inflammatory foods consist of fruits and vegetables, tea, coffee, whole grain bread, breakfast cereal, low-fat cheese, olive oil and canola oil, nuts, chocolate, and moderate amounts of red wine and beer. Pro-inflammatory foods include unprocessed and processed red meat, organ meats, chips, and soft-drink beverages.

fruits and veggies

Anti-inflammatory foods consist of fruits and vegetables, tea, coffee, whole grain bread, breakfast cereal, low-fat cheese, olive oil and canola oil, nuts, chocolate, and moderate amounts of red wine and beer. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

“Our dose-response analysis showed that even partial adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet may provide a health benefit,” said lead author Dr. Joanna Kaluza, an associate professor at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, in Poland.

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Penny Smith – Wiley
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Abstract for “Influence of anti‐inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies” by J. Kaluza, N. Håkansson, H. R. Harris N. Orsini, K. Michaëlsson, and A. Wolk in Journal of Internal Medicine. Published September 12 2018.
doi:10.1111/joim.12823

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Wiley”Anti-Inflammatory Diet Linked to Reduced Risk of Early Death.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 14 September 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/death-diet-inflammation-9869/>.
Wiley(2018, September 14). Anti-Inflammatory Diet Linked to Reduced Risk of Early Death. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved September 14, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/death-diet-inflammation-9869/
Wiley”Anti-Inflammatory Diet Linked to Reduced Risk of Early Death.” http://neurosciencenews.com/death-diet-inflammation-9869/ (accessed September 14, 2018).

Abstract

Influence of anti‐inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies

Background
The associations between an anti‐inflammatory diet and both all‐cause and cause‐specific mortality have been studied previously; however, the influence of an anti‐inflammatory diet on survival time has not been investigated. Moreover, the potential modification of these associations by smoking status remains unclear.

Objective
The aims of this study were to examine the associations between an anti‐inflammatory diet index (AIDI) and all‐cause and cause‐specific mortality, to determine the association between the AIDI and differences in survival time and to assess effect modification by smoking status.

Methods
The study population included 68 273 Swedish men and women (aged 45–83 years) at baseline. The anti‐inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated using the validated AIDI, which includes 11 potential anti‐inflammatory and five potential pro‐inflammatory foods. Cox proportional hazards and Laplace regression were used to estimate hazard ratios and differences in survival time.

Results
During 16 years of follow‐up (1 057 959 person‐years), 16 088 deaths [5980 due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5252 due to cancer] were recorded. Participants in the highest versus lowest quartile of the AIDI had lower risks of all‐cause (18% reduction, 95% CI: 14–22%), CVD (20%, 95% CI: 14–26%) and cancer (13%, 95% CI: 5–20%) mortality. The strongest inverse associations between the highest and lowest quartiles of AIDI and risk of mortality were observed in current smokers: 31%, 36% and 22% lower risks of all‐cause, CVD and cancer mortality, respectively. The difference in survival time between current smokers in the lowest AIDI quartile and never smokers in the highest quartile was 4.6 years.

Conclusion
Adherence to a diet with high anti‐inflammatory potential may reduce all‐cause, CVD and cancer mortality and prolong survival time especially amongst smokers.

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