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Risk of Burnout Can Be Estimated by Analyzing Saliva Samples

Summary: Researchers report a simple saliva test that measures cortisol levels at specific times of the day, can identify those at risk of stress and depression.

Source: Medical University of Vienna.

According to calculations from the World Health Organisation, depression occupies first place in the global “disease burden” and, by 2030, experts estimate that there will be three mental illnesses in the Top 5: depression, Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia and alcohol addiction. Even Austria is seeing an increase in mental problems such as burnout and, since 2010, these have been the main reason for invalidity retirement. Researchers from MedUni Vienna and the Health Insurance Agency’s Health and Prevention Center have now shown that burnout can be identified by means of a simple saliva test. The hormone cortisol is the marker used for this.

Cortisol is actually an anti-stress hormone, which activates metabolic break-down processes, thereby making energy-rich compounds available to the human body. Its damping effect on the immune system is also used to prevent over-reactions and to suppress inflammation. Cortisol is predominantly produced in the early morning on waking, to crank up the circulation, as it were.

In healthy people, the cortisol level then falls again over the course of the day – until there is practically no measurable cortisol left by the evening. The picture is very different for people who are under constant stress: the body keeps the cortisol level within the measurable range for much longer, in order to cope with the prevailing stress – if the stress then becomes “chronic”, cortisol levels remain high without any normal daily pattern.

The three lead investigators, Helmuth Haslacher and Alexander Pilger from the Division of Medical-Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics (KILM) of MedUni Vienna and Robert Winker from the stress clinic at the Health and Prevention Center of the KFA (Health Insurance Agency) have now shown that elevated cortisol levels can be detected by means of a single saliva sample, taken either at midday or in the evening, so that the risk of burnout can be measured.

The study involved comparing the work-related stress and cortisol levels of burnout patients with those of healthy employees. “It was found that people who were identified as having a high level of work-related stress using psychological methods had noticeably higher cortisol values at midday and also in the evening. We also observed an improvement in the clinical course and cortisol levels of patients receiving treatment in the special stress clinic set up by the KFA. This means that we can use these markers for preventively identifying people who are at greater risk of burnout,” say the experts. Follow-on studies are therefore to be conducted to evaluate this result and to develop a valid biochemical testing system for use in everyday clinical practice to identify high-risk candidates for burnout.

a stressed man sitting at a desk

In healthy people, the cortisol level then falls again over the course of the day – until there is practically no measurable cortisol left by the evening. NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the Medical University of Vienna news release.

According to the researchers, compared with the previously used early-morning samples – taken three times after waking at fifteen-minute intervals – the midday and evening saliva samples also provided a much better and more reliable result: “Our current data indicate that people at risk of burnout can be identified from a single saliva sample with almost 100% accuracy, whereas the multiple early-morning sampling involved more laborious methods and produced a much larger range of variation.” Reliable analysis is now possible just four hours after providing the sample and this method even produced better results than analysing stress-related blood parameters. “We will use these results to further reinforce our efforts to prevent stress-related illnesses in collaboration with the stress clinic of the KFA Health and Prevention Center.

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Medical University of Vienna
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the Medical University of Vienna news release.
Original Research: Open access research for “Midday and nadir salivary cortisol appear superior to cortisol awakening response in burnout assessment and monitoring” by Alexander Pilger, Helmuth Haslacher, Bernhard M. Meyer, Alexandra Lackner, Selma Nassan-Agha, Sonja Nistler, Claudia Stangelmaier, Georg Endler, Andrea Mikulits, Ingrid Priemer, Franz Ratzinger, Elisabeth Ponocny-Seliger, Evelyne Wohlschläger-Krenn, Manuela Teufelhart, Heidemarie Täuber, Thomas M. Scherzer, Thomas Perkmann, Galateja Jordakieva, Lukas Pezawas & Robert Winker in Scientific Reports. Published June 14 2018
doi:10.1038/s41598-018-27386-1

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Medical University of Vienna “Risk of Burnout Can Be Estimated by Analyzing Saliva Samples.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 15 June 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/burnout-saliva-sample-9348/>.
Medical University of Vienna (2018, June 15). Risk of Burnout Can Be Estimated by Analyzing Saliva Samples. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved June 15, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/burnout-saliva-sample-9348/
Medical University of Vienna “Risk of Burnout Can Be Estimated by Analyzing Saliva Samples.” http://neurosciencenews.com/burnout-saliva-sample-9348/ (accessed June 15, 2018).

Abstract

Midday and nadir salivary cortisol appear superior to cortisol awakening response in burnout assessment and monitoring

Burnout and work-related stress symptoms of anxiety disorder and depression cause prolonged work absenteeism and early retirement. Hence, reliable identification of patients under risk and monitoring of treatment success is highly warranted. We aimed to evaluate stress-specific biomarkers in a population-based, “real-world” cohort (burnouts: n = 40, healthy controls: n = 26), recruited at a preventive care ward, at baseline and after a four-month follow up, during which patients received medical and psychological treatment. At baseline, significantly higher levels of salivary cortisol were observed in the burnout group compared to the control group. This was even more pronounced in midday- (p < 0.001) and nadir samples (p < 0.001) than for total morning cortisol secretion (p < 0.01). The treatment program resulted in a significant reduction of stress, anxiety, and depression scores (all p < 0.001), with 60% of patients showing a clinically relevant improvement. This was accompanied by a ~30% drop in midday cortisol levels (p < 0.001), as well as a ~25% decrease in cortisol nadir (p < 0.05), although not directly correlating with score declines. Our data emphasize the potential usefulness of midday and nadir salivary cortisol as markers in the assessment and biomonitoring of burnout.

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