We Are More Satisfied With Life as We Age, Thanks to Oxytocin

Summary: A new study links higher levels of oxytocin to greater life satisfaction as we age.

Source: Frontiers

A new study has linked life satisfaction to the chemistry in our brains.

People that release more of the neurochemical oxytocin are kinder to others and tend to be more satisfied with their lives. In addition, oxytocin release increases with age, showing why, on average, people are more caring as they get older.

These findings are consistent with many religious philosophies, where satisfaction with one’s life is enhanced by helping others.

People whose brains release more of the neurochemical oxytocin are kinder to others and are more satisfied with their lives. This is the finding of new research, published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, that also discovered that oxytocin release increases with age, showing why, on average, people are more caring as they get older.

“The findings of our study are consistent with many religions and philosophies, where satisfaction with one’s life is enhanced by helping others,” reported first author Dr Paul J Zak of Claremont Graduate University.

“Participants in our study who released the most oxytocin were more generous to charity when given the opportunity and performed many other helping behaviors. The change in oxytocin was also positively related to participants’ empathy, religious participation, and gratitude.”

Oxytocin

Oxytocin is a neurochemical widely known for its role in social attachment, interpersonal trust, and generosity. Zak and his colleagues wanted to understand if the release of oxytocin changed with age, as is found with some other neurochemicals that influence feelings and behaviors.

“We have previously shown a link between how kind and generous people are, known as prosocial behaviors, and the release of oxytocin,” said Zak.

“Seniors spend more time volunteering and donate a larger proportion of their income to charity than do younger people, so we wanted to see if there was a neurochemical basis for these behaviors.”

The researchers recruited more than 100 people for the study, ranging between the ages of 18 and 99. They were each shown a video about a little boy with cancer, which previous work had confirmed to induce oxytocin release in the brain. Blood was taken before and after the video to measure the change in oxytocin. 

“Participants had the option to donate some of their earnings from the study to a childhood cancer charity, and this was used to measure their immediate prosocial behavior. We also collected data on their emotional states, to provide information on their overall satisfaction with life,” explained Zak.

Be kind, love life

“People who released the most oxytocin in the experiment were not only more generous to charity, but also performed many other helping behaviors. This is the first time a distinct change in oxytocin has been related to past prosocial behaviors,” reported Zak.

This shows a happy older lady
The finding that helping behaviors improve the quality of life is consistent with many faith traditions and philosophies. Image is in the public domain

“We also found that the release of oxytocin increased with age and was positively associated with life satisfaction.”

The finding that helping behaviors improve the quality of life is consistent with many faith traditions and philosophies. Serving others appears to prime the brain to release more oxytocin in a positive feedback loop of increased empathy and gratitude.

Zak would like to repeat this study in a more ethnically and geographically diverse sample of people to see if the findings hold for different cultures.

“We would also like to conduct a longer-term measurement of neurophysiology using noninvasive wearable technologies to see what specific activities raise people’s satisfaction with life,” he concluded.

About this aging and happiness research news

Author: Suzanna Burgelman
Source: Frontiers
Contact: Suzanna Burgelman – Frontiers
Image: The image is in the public domain

Original Research: Open access.
Oxytocin Release Increases With Age and Is Associated With Life Satisfaction and Prosocial Behaviors” by Paul J Zak et al. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience


Abstract

Oxytocin Release Increases With Age and Is Associated With Life Satisfaction and Prosocial Behaviors

Helping behaviors and life satisfaction generally increase after middle-age. Identifying the neural substrates of prosocial behaviors in older adults may offer additional insights into these changes over the lifespan.

The present study examines the endogenous release of the neuromodulator oxytocin (OT) in participants aged 18–99 and its relationship to prosocial behaviors. OT has been shown to influence trust, altruism, charity, and generosity, yet the effect of age on OT release has not been well-established.

Blood samples before and after a video stimulus were obtained from 103 participants in order to examine the impact of OT on prosocial behaviors.

We found that OT release following a social prime increased with age (r = 0.49, p = 0.001) and that OT moderated the relationship between age and donations to charity.

We tested for robustness by examining three additional prosocial behaviors, money and goods donated to charity during the past year and social-sector volunteering. OT moderated the impact of age on all three prosocial behaviors (ps < 0.05).

The analysis also showed that participants’ change in OT was positively associated with satisfaction with life (p = 0.04), empathic concern (p = 0.015), dispositional gratitude (p = 0.019), and religious commitment (p = 0.001).

Our findings indicate that the neural chemistry that helps sustain social relationships and live a fulfilled life appear to strengthen with age.

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  1. Thank you for distributing this great bit of research findings. It’s also evidence for why is spite of disbelief we are emerging as the least destructive species in history but sadly with the science that could destroy the planet!

  2. People are kinder as they get older because they have suffered loss, pain and have experienced hardship moreso then their younger countparts. Elderly are also able to give back to their community bc they were able to accumulate wealth and had time to take crlare of themselves and their family. In addition, they can offer more of their time due to retirement

  3. Enjoyed this article,but have a query.i think you alter participants thinking if your asking them to donate to a charity if they want.choosing to or not to donate is raising oxy after the fact.increased oxy comes from a more natural direction. Spontaneity shows the individuals oxy levels at a more natural approach.

  4. Perdue pharma very very satisfied for making 6.8 trillion dollars and filing bankruptcy with no liability for the 6.78 million overdose deaths in US for last 24 yeard. 6.8 trillion in tax dollars for ER and paramedic responses, jails, courts, arrests, law enforcement,courts, lawyers, judges, administration, parole, probation,..
    Afghan opium with military expensive over 8.9 Trillion.
    ..the non death overdoses with loss of work, rehab, family dysfunction and loss of one or more parents tonraise children properly, best estimates range 8.87 trillion to 11.6 trillion.
    Just doing the math.
    The other weapon of mass destruction.
    Making A killing. Now who said oxycontin was a good thing? What sociopath paid off moron wrote that article?

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