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Children With Autism Find Understanding Facial Expressions Difficult But Make Similar Mistakes as Peers

Summary: According to researchers, while teens with ASD do have a difficult time recognizing emotion from facial expressions, the types of mistakes they make are similar to those of the same age without ASD.

Source: University of Bristol.

Young people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognising and distinguishing between different facial expressions, according to research from one of the largest studies to look at emotion recognition in children and adolescents with ASC. The University of Bristol findings are published today in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

A team from Bristol’s School of Experimental Psychology aimed to find out whether six basic facial expressions differing in intensity are challenging for young people with autism to recognise.

Researchers gave 63 children and adolescents with an ASC diagnosis and 64 without a diagnosis, an internet-based test of emotion recognition. The two groups, aged between 6 – 16 years-old, were presented with ‘happy’, ‘sad’, ‘surprised’, ‘disgusted’, ‘scared’ and ‘angry’ facial expressions and asked to select a label that matched the expression. Some faces had exaggerated ‘high-intensity’ expressions — which were easier to identify, while others had subtle ‘low-intensity’ expressions — which were more difficult but considered more relevant to real world interactions. The team also measured language skills and non-verbal reasoning skills in order to see if differences in these skills explained any differences in ability to recognise emotions.

Results from this study found that young people with ASC do find it harder to recognise emotion from facial expressions. However, the types of mistake made by young people with ASC were very similar to the types of mistake made by young people without ASC. For example, young people in both groups often mistook ‘fear’ for ‘surprise’ and confused ‘disgust’ and ‘anger’.

Interestingly, the biggest differences between the ASC and non-ASC groups was for the clearest ‘high-intensity’ expressions. The researchers think this was due to participants, including those without ASD, struggling to recognise the emotion in the ‘low-intensity’ expressions, making it hard for them to then see any clear difference between groups.

Image shows different faces.

Examples of morph sequence stimuli from low intensity (left) to high intensity (right). From top to bottom; male adult angry sequence, female adult surprise sequence, male child happy sequence, female child sad sequence. NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the University of Bristol news release.

Sarah Griffiths, one of the study’s researchers who completed the study as part of her PhD at the University of Bristol but is now based at the University of Cambridge’s Autism Research Centre, said: “This study is important as previous research provided very mixed results with some finding individuals with autism less accurate in recognising expressions on average, and others finding no difference. In this study we used an online platform to run a larger study to answer this question more conclusively and found that individuals with autism are on average a bit less accurate at recognising emotion from faces.”

Professor Chris Jarrold, Professor in Cognitive Development in the School of Experimental Psychology at the University of Bristol, said: “These findings provide further evidence that people with ASC have a degree of difficulty in recognising basic emotions from facial expressions. For those who do struggle with recognising emotions from faces, teaching emotion recognition may be helpful for learning to navigate social situations.”

To coincide with this research, the team have developed an iPad app to teach facial emotion recognition for people with and without Autism Spectrum Conditions. You can download the free app “About face” here. This app contains both the high and low-intensity expressions that were used in the study so the difficulty can be tailored to the ability level of the user.

About this autism research article

The ninth annual World Autism Awareness Day is 2 April 2017.

Funding: The research was funded by a University of Bristol Science Faculty PhD Scholarship and the MRC-IEU.

Source: University of Bristol
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the University of Bristol news release.
Original Research: Full open access research for “Impaired Recognition of Basic Emotions from Facial Expressions in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Assessing the Importance of Expression Intensity” by Sarah Griffiths, Christopher Jarrold, Ian S. Penton-Voak, Andy T. Woods, Andy L. Skinner, and Marcus R. Munafò in Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Published online March 31 2017 doi:10.1007/s10803-017-3091-7

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Bristol “Children With Autism Find Understanding Facial Expressions Difficult But Make Similar Mistakes as Peers.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 1 April 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/facial-expression-autism-6322/>.
University of Bristol (2017, April 1). Children With Autism Find Understanding Facial Expressions Difficult But Make Similar Mistakes as Peers. NeuroscienceNew. Retrieved April 1, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/facial-expression-autism-6322/
University of Bristol “Children With Autism Find Understanding Facial Expressions Difficult But Make Similar Mistakes as Peers.” http://neurosciencenews.com/facial-expression-autism-6322/ (accessed April 1, 2017).

Abstract

Impaired Recognition of Basic Emotions from Facial Expressions in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Assessing the Importance of Expression Intensity

It has been proposed that impairments in emotion recognition in ASD are greater for more subtle expressions of emotion. We measured recognition of 6 basic facial expressions at 8 intensity levels in young people (6–16 years) with ASD (N = 63) and controls (N = 64) via an Internet platform. Participants with ASD were less accurate than controls at labelling expressions across intensity levels, although differences at very low levels were not detected due to floor effects. Recognition accuracy did not correlate with parent-reported social functioning in either group. These findings provide further evidence for an impairment in recognition of basic emotion in ASD and do not support the idea that this impairment is limited solely to low intensity expressions.

“Impaired Recognition of Basic Emotions from Facial Expressions in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Assessing the Importance of Expression Intensity” by Sarah Griffiths, Christopher Jarrold, Ian S. Penton-Voak, Andy T. Woods, Andy L. Skinner, and Marcus R. Munafò in Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Published online March 31 2017 doi:10.1007/s10803-017-3091-7

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