Multiple Sclerosis

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The gut may be involved in the development of multiple sclerosis

Increased levels of Smad7 in T-cells is linked to multiple sclerosis-like symptoms in mice. In the intestines, the T-cells were more frequently activated and migrated to the central nervous system, where they triggered inflammation. Similar activation was seen in human patients with multiple sclerosis. The findings provide further evidence that multiple sclerosis may start in the intestines and spread via the CNS.... Read More...
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Gut instincts: Researchers discover first clues on how gut health influences brain health

Mice bred to be germ-free, and those treated with antibiotics showed a significant reduction in the ability to learn that a threatening danger was no longer present. Sequencing the RNA of microglia in the brains of the animals reveals altered gene expression in the immune cells, which play a role in remodeling how neurons connect during the learning process. Restoring the gut microbiota reverse the learning problems.... Read More...
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Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis: Mouse study

TH17 cells produced increased amounts of SerpinB1, a protein implicated in multiple sclerosis symptoms. SerpinB1 cells were identified with antibodies targeting the CXCR6 surface protein. Using monoclonal antibodies to target CXCR6, the cells disappeared significantly, and the mice primed to develop MS did not develop the disease.... Read More...
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X chromosome gene may explain why women are more prone to autoimmune diseases

Kdm6a, a gene on the X chromosome appears to be associated with the development of autoimmune diseases, such as Multiple Sclerosis. The gene is expressed more in the immune cells of females than males. When Kdm6a was deleted in mouse models of MS, the animals had improved symptoms and reduced inflammation. The findings shed light on why women are more prone to autoimmune diseases than males.... Read More...