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New Type of Botox Identified

Summary: Researchers have identified a new active botulinum neurotoxin. The discovery could lead to the development of new protein therapeutics.

Source: University of Waterloo.

A new source of the botulinum neurotoxin was discovered by Canadian and American scientists in a strain of animal gut bacteria known as Enterococcus faecium. The neurotoxic protein is known for its paradoxical ability to remove wrinkles yet cause botulism, a potentially fatal illness associated with food poisoning.

Over the past 20 years, there has also been a growing number of therapeutic applications for botulinum toxin type A, known as Botox, including treatment for migraines, leaky bladders, excessive sweating, and cardiac conditions.

“This is the first time that an active botulinum toxin has been identified outside of Clostridium botulinum and its relatives, which are often found in soil and untreated water,” said Andrew Doxey, one of the study’s two corresponding authors and a bioinformatics professor at the University of Waterloo. “Its discovery has implications in several fields, from monitoring the emergence of new pathogens to the development of new protein therapeutics–it’s a game changer.”

Doxey’s findings were developed in collaboration with researchers from Harvard University and the Boston Children’s Hospital.

Image shows a syringe.

The researchers concluded that the botulinum toxin was likely transferred from C. botulinum bacteria in the environment into the E. faecium bacteria in the cow’s gut, showing that the toxin can be transferred between very different species. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to University of Waterloo.

In the study, originally designed to investigate the origins of antibiotic resistance in E. faecium bacteria, the researchers were able to sequence the genome of the E. faecium bacteria drawn from cow feces. The genome was then run through computer programs in Doxey’s lab, which found the gene for botulinum toxin in the bacterial strain.

The researchers concluded that the botulinum toxin was likely transferred from C. botulinum bacteria in the environment into the E. faecium bacteria in the cow’s gut, showing that the toxin can be transferred between very different species.

“The botulinum toxin is a powerful and versatile protein therapeutic” says Michael Mansfield, a Biology doctoral candidate in the Doxey Lab and one of the study’s lead authors. “By finding more versions of the toxin in nature, we can potentially expand and optimize its therapeutic applications even further.”

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Matthew Grant – University of Waterloo
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to University of Waterloo.
Original Research: The study will appear in Cell Host & Microbe.

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Waterloo “New Type of Botox Identified.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 26 January 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/new-botox-8378/>.
University of Waterloo (2018, January 26). New Type of Botox Identified. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved January 26, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/new-botox-8378/
University of Waterloo “New Type of Botox Identified.” http://neurosciencenews.com/new-botox-8378/ (accessed January 26, 2018).
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