neurodevelopment

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New research reviews the state of vaccine safety science

Researchers will present a systematic review of scientific evidence for, and against causal associations for 47 proposed adverse events following immunizations at PAS 2019. The review found that, for 12 of the 47 AEFIs in the study, a causal relationship has been established with at least one vaccine. With the exception of deltoid bursitis, where a vaccine is administered incorrectly, causing pain to the arm, the adverse reactions are very rare. For the other 35 AEFis, the evidence does not support a causal relationship between conditions, such as ASD, asthma, diabetes, multiple sclerosis or SIDs, and vaccinations.... Read More...
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Placental function linked to brain injuries associated with autism

Disruptions in the supply of allopregnanolone, a hormone created by the placenta late in pregnancy, to the developing fetus can leave children more vulnerable to brain injuries associated with ASD. Losing the supply of ALLO alters cerebellar development, an area of the brain critical for motor coordination and social cognition, impacting the post-birth development of cerebellar white matter. An experimental model revealed deficient cerebellar white matter resulted in social impairments and an increase in repetitive behaviors, two hallmark features associated with autism. ... Read More...
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MMR vaccine and autism link debunked again: MMR vaccine reduces ASD risk in subgroup of girls

Another new study refutes claims of a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. The study reports no link has been found between MMR and an increased autism risk, even in children with other risk factors for ASD. Researchers also reported, in a subgroup of girls, the MMR vaccine reduced the risk of autism by between 16% and 21%. No link was found between other vaccinations, such as Hib and DTaP, and an increased risk of ASD. ... Read More...
A DNA strand

Gene repair improves memory and seizures in adult autism model

Researchers genetically restored levels of the SynGAP protein in adult mice who were deficient. Restoring the protein levels resulted in improved memory and a reduction in seizures related to the SYNGAP1 disorder, a form of autism. Findings suggest it is possible to extend the window of treatment for those with this specific form of ASD, beyond infancy and into adulthood.... Read More...