mental health month

This shows a gym

Exercise is the new primary prescription for those with mental health problems

Adding exercise as a treatment for patients in psychiatric care facilities has positive benefits and is proving to be more effective than medications or psychotherapy alone. Exercise helps reduce mental health disorder symptoms such as anxiety, depression, anger and psychomotor agitation. Researchers say exercise also helps to develop a more balanced and integrated sense of self for those with mental health disorders.... Read More...
This is a vial of ketamine

Ketamine: The illicit party psychedelic that promises to heal depression

Ketamine, an anesthetics which has been commonly used as an illicit party drug, is helping people overcome depression. The drug works rapidly and provides lasting relief from depressive symptoms for weeks after exposure. Researchers are examining how ketamine works in the brain to help positively influence behavior in those with mood disorders.... Read More...
This shows pizza, burgers and other junk foods

Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression: Mouse study

A mechanism that links exposure to high-fat diets in mice to changes in hypothalamic function which leads to depression has been identified. Saturated fatty acids enter the brain via the bloodstream, where they accumulate and affect key signaling pathways associated with the development of depression.... Read More...
This shows a person holding his tummy as if in pain

Study explains why a moody gut often accompanies depression

Mice with a genetic mutation linked to severe depression had impaired ability for neurons in the gut and brain to create serotonin. The reduction of serotonin in the gut led to a deterioration in the gut's lining, slowing the movement of contents through the GI tract and resulting in constipation. However, treatment with 5-HTP increased neurogenesis in the gut, restoring normal function.... Read More...
This shows a depressed looking little girl.

AI can detect depression in a child’s speech

An auditory-based machine learning algorithm was able to identify children diagnosed with depression and anxiety with 80% accuracy after analyzing recordings of their speech. The algorithm identified eight audio features that signify a higher risk of depression. Of these, a lower pitch of voice, repeatable speech inflections and a higher pitch response to surprise stimuli, were more indicative of depression. Researchers hope to develop a smartphone app that records and analyzes speech immediately, helping to better detect children at risk of internalizing disorders.... Read More...