frontotemporal dementia

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Frontotemporal dementia is associated with alterations in immune system function

Researchers discovered increased inflammatory activity in a subgroup of patients with frontotemporal dementia. The increased inflammation was indicated by elevated levels of cytokines known to increase inflammatory response and decreased levels of IL-10, which reduces inflammation. The inflammation was associated with Parkinsonism's symptoms and rapid cognitive and functional decline. The study also revealed patients with FTD are less likely to develop cancer.... Read More...
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Map of broken brain networks shows why people lose speech in language-based dementia

Researchers have identified the location of dysfunctional brain networks that lead to impaired sentence production and word-finding in primary progressive aphasia (PPA). PPA can occur in those with neurodegenerative diseases, such as frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Mapping the networks allows clinicians to apply non-invasive brain stimulation to potentially improve speech in those with PPA. ... Read More...
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Memory Preserver: Researchers Develop Vaccine That Could Protect Against Alzheimer’s

Researchers have engineered a vaccine using virus-like particles that target Tau tangles in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Following the administration of the vaccine, the mice developed antibodies that cleared tau proteins, with the response lasting for a month. The mice also showed improvements in memory based tests and had less brain shrinkage than their peers who did not receive the vaccine. This suggests the vaccine prevented apoptosis. Researchers hope to move the vaccine to human clinical trials in the future.... Read More...
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Why visual stimulation may work in fight against Alzheimer’s: Mouse study

Inducing gamma oscillations with visual stimulation via a process known as gamma entrainment using sensory stimuli, or GENUS, was shown to reduce amyloid plaques and phosphorylated tau in mouse models of dementia. Providing GENUS daily during the early stages of neurodegeneration helps preserve neural and synaptic density across multiple brain areas and improves cognitive performance for learning and spatial memory tasks.... Read More...