gut-brain axis

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The gut may be involved in the development of multiple sclerosis

Increased levels of Smad7 in T-cells is linked to multiple sclerosis-like symptoms in mice. In the intestines, the T-cells were more frequently activated and migrated to the central nervous system, where they triggered inflammation. Similar activation was seen in human patients with multiple sclerosis. The findings provide further evidence that multiple sclerosis may start in the intestines and spread via the CNS.... Read More...
This shows the outline of two bodies. One has the head highlighted red, the other has the gut highlighted red

Where does Parkinson’s disease start? In the brain or gut? Or both?

Lewy body disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia, comprise of two distinct subtypes. One subtype originates in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the gut and spreads to the brain. The other originates in the brain, or enters the brain via the olfactory system, before spreading to the brainstem and PNS.... Read More...
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Micronutrients affect gut bacteria associated with ADHD in small but promising study

A small-scale study found children with ADHD who took micronutrients had lower levels of gut bacteria previously linked to the disorder, and a healthier range of overall microbiota. The study indicates micronutrient supplements could be a safe therapy for those with ADHD. Researchers stress further research is needed.... Read More...
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Gut microbes protect against neurologic damage from viral infections

A healthy and diverse microbiome is essential for quickly clearing viral infections in the nervous system to prevent risks associated with multiple sclerosis. Mice with lower gut bacteria had weaker immune responses and were unable to eliminate viruses, leading to worsening paralysis. Those treated with antibiotics before infection had fewer microglia. ... Read More...
This diagram shows how a-synuclein travels from the gut to the brain via the vagus nerve

New research shows Parkinson’s disease origins in the gut

A new study adds to the growing body of evidence that Parkinson's disease may start in the gut. Researchers found gut-to-brain propagation of alpha-synuclein spread via the vagus nerve. The study provides a more accurate model of Parkinson's progression and could lead to new treatments to halt or prevent this neurodegenerative disease.... Read More...