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Greening Vacant Lots Reduce Feelings of Depression in City Dwellers

Summary: A new study reports tidying up and greening vacant lots in urban areas, can have a positive influence on the mental health of local residents. Researchers say people who lived within quarter of a mile of greened lots had a 41% decrease in depressive feelings compared to those who lived near overgrown lots.

Source: University of Pennsylvania.

Greening vacant urban land significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions show in a new randomized, controlled study published in JAMA Network Open. The findings have implications for cities across the United States, where 15 percent of land is deemed “vacant” and often blighted or filled with trash and overgrown vegetation.

For the first time, the research team measured the mental health of Philadelphia residents before and after nearby vacant lots had been converted into green spaces, as well as residents living near untreated abandoned lots, and those that just received trash clean-up. They found that people living within a quarter of a mile radius of greened lots had a 41.5 percent decrease in feelings of depression compared to those who lived near the lots that had not been cleaned. Those living near green lots also experienced a nearly 63 percent decrease in self-reported poor mental health compared to those living near lots that received no intervention.

The findings add to the growing body of evidence showing how revitalized spaces in blighted urban areas can help improve safety and health, such as reducing crime, violence, and stress levels. The most recent study from the same team in February found up to a 29 percent decrease in gun violence near treated lots. This latest work is believed to be the first experimental study to test changes in the mental health of residents after nearby vacant lots were greened.

“Dilapidated and vacant spaces are factors that put residents at an increased risk of depression and stress, and may explain why socioeconomic disparities in mental illness persist,” said lead author Eugenia C. South, MD, MSHP, an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine and a member of the Center for Emergency Care and Policy Research at Penn. “What these new data show us is that making structural changes, like greening lots, has a positive impact on the health of those living in these neighborhoods. And that it can be achieved in a cost-effective and scalable way – not only in Philadelphia but in other cities with the same harmful environmental surroundings.”

For the trial, 541 vacant lots throughout Philadelphia were randomly assigned to one of three study arms: greening intervention, a trash clean-up intervention, or a control group with no intervention. The greening intervention involved removing trash, grading the land, planting new grass and a small number of trees, installing a low wooden perimeter fence, and regular monthly maintenance. The trash clean-up involved removing trash, limited grass mowing where possible, and regular monthly maintenance. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society LandCare program performed the greening, trash clean-up, and maintenance.

lawn mower

Results were most pronounced when looking only at neighborhoods below the poverty line, with feelings of depression among residents who lived near green lots decreasing significantly–by more than 68 percent.. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to University of Pennsylvania Irving Medical Center.

Two sets of pre-intervention and post-intervention mental health surveys were performed among 342 people, 18 months before revitalization and 18 months after. Researchers used the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6), a widely used community screening tool, to evaluate the prevalence of serious mental illness in the community. Participants were asked to indicate how often they felt nervous, hopeless, restless, depressed, that everything was an effort, and worthless.

Results were most pronounced when looking only at neighborhoods below the poverty line, with feelings of depression among residents who lived near green lots decreasing significantly–by more than 68 percent.

Analyses of the trash clean-up intervention compared to no intervention showed no significant changes in self-reported mental health.

“The lack of change in these groups is likely because the trash clean-up lots had no additional green space created,” said co-author John MacDonald, PhD, a professor of criminology and sociology at Penn. “The findings support that exposure to more natural environments can be part of restoring mental health, particularly for people living in stressful and chaotic urban environments.”

The study shows transforming blighted neighborhood environments into green space can improve the trajectory of the residents’ mental health, the authors said. Adding green space to neighborhoods should be considered alongside individual treatments to address mental health problems in low resource communities. Additionally, greening is an affordable approach, costing about $1,600 per vacant lot and $180 per year to maintain. For these reasons, the authors said, vacant lot greening may be an extremely attractive intervention for policy makers seeking to address urban blight and promote health.

“Greening vacant land is a highly inexpensive and scalable way to improve cities and enhance people’s health while encouraging them to remain in their home neighborhoods,” said senior author Charles C. Branas, PhD, chair of Epidemiology at Columbia University and an adjunct professor in the department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine. “While mental health therapies will always be a vital aspect of treatment, revitalizing the places where people live, work, and play, may have broad, population-level impact on mental health outcomes.”

About this neuroscience research article

Co-authors on the study Bernadette C. Hohl, PhD, from Rutgers University, and Michelle C. Kondo, PhD, from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service.

Funding: The study was supported by the by National Institutes of Health (R01AA020331 and R01DA010164) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (R49CE002474).

Source: Katie Delach – University of Pennsylvania
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to University of Pennsylvania Irving Medical Center.
Original Research: Open access research for “Effect of Greening Vacant Land on Mental Health of Community-Dwelling Adults” by Eugenia C. South, MD, MS; Bernadette C. Hohl, PhD; Michelle C. Kondo, PhD4; John M. MacDonald, PhD; and Charles C. Branas, PhD in JAMA Network Open. Published July 20 2018.
doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.0298

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Pennsylvania”Greening Vacant Lots Reduce Feelings of Depression in City Dwellers.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 20 July 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/greening-depression-9562/>.
University of Pennsylvania(2018, July 20). Greening Vacant Lots Reduce Feelings of Depression in City Dwellers. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved July 20, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/greening-depression-9562/
University of Pennsylvania”Greening Vacant Lots Reduce Feelings of Depression in City Dwellers.” http://neurosciencenews.com/greening-depression-9562/ (accessed July 20, 2018).

Abstract

Effect of Greening Vacant Land on Mental Health of Community-Dwelling Adults

Importance
Neighborhood physical conditions have been associated with mental illness and may partially explain persistent socioeconomic disparities in the prevalence of poor mental health.

Objective
To evaluate whether interventions to green vacant urban land can improve self-reported mental health.

Design, Setting, and Participants
This citywide cluster randomized trial examined 442 community-dwelling sampled adults living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, within 110 vacant lot clusters randomly assigned to 3 study groups. Participants were followed up for 18 months preintervention and postintervention. This trial was conducted from October 1, 2011, to November 30, 2014. Data were analyzed from July 1, 2015, to April 16, 2017.

Interventions
The greening intervention involved removing trash, grading the land, planting new grass and a small number of trees, installing a low wooden perimeter fence, and performing regular monthly maintenance. The trash cleanup intervention involved removal of trash, limited grass mowing where possible, and regular monthly maintenance. The control group received no intervention.

Main Outcomes and Measures
Self-reported mental health measured by the Kessler-6 Psychological Distress Scale and the components of this scale.

Results
A total of 110 clusters containing 541 vacant lots were enrolled in the trial and randomly allocated to the following 1 of 3 study groups: the greening intervention (37 clusters [33.6%]), the trash cleanup intervention (36 clusters [32.7%]), or no intervention (37 clusters [33.6%]). Of the 442 participants, the mean (SD) age was 44.6 (15.1) years, 264 (59.7%) were female, and 194 (43.9%) had a family income less than $25 000. A total of 342 participants (77.4%) had follow-up data and were included in the analysis. Of these, 117 (34.2%) received the greening intervention, 107 (31.3%) the trash cleanup intervention, and 118 (34.5%) no intervention. Intention-to-treat analysis of the greening intervention compared with no intervention demonstrated a significant decrease in participants who were feeling depressed (−41.5%; 95% CI, −63.6% to −5.9%; P = .03) and worthless (−50.9%; 95% CI, −74.7% to −4.7%; P = .04), as well as a nonsignificant reduction in overall self-reported poor mental health (−62.8%; 95% CI, −86.2% to 0.4%; P = .051). For participants living in neighborhoods below the poverty line, the greening intervention demonstrated a significant decrease in feeling depressed (−68.7%; 95% CI, −86.5% to −27.5%; P = .007). Intention-to-treat analysis of those living near the trash cleanup intervention compared with no intervention showed no significant changes in self-reported poor mental health.

Conclusions and Relevance
Among community-dwelling adults, self-reported feelings of depression and worthlessness were significantly decreased, and self-reported poor mental health was nonsignificantly reduced for those living near greened vacant land. The treatment of blighted physical environments, particularly in resource-limited urban settings, can be an important treatment for mental health problems alongside other patient-level treatments.

Trial Registration
isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN92582209

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