Neuroscience News is an online science magazine. We offer free to read research articles covering neuroscience, neurology, psychology, artificial intelligence, neurotechnology, robotics, deep learning, neurosurgery, mental health and more.

Neuroscience Research Articles

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Study reveals the loss of smell and taste associated with the Delta wave of COVID-19 infection was a prevalent symptom and not prevented by the vaccines. Many who contracted COVID during the earlier phases of the disease experienced loss of taste and smell for months following infection.

Science research articles covering neurology, brain cancer, traumatic brain injuries, neurosurgery, neuroanatomy, brain research and neurological disorders.

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A new mouse study identifies a targeted delivery method system that boosts the number of specialized anti-inflammatory immune cells within the brain to areas restricted by brain inflammation and damage. The system helped to protect against apoptosis associated with brain injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis.

Science research articles cover psychology, depression, mental health, schizophrenia, mental disorders, happiness, stress, PTSD, autism, psychiatry and therapy.

Top Neuroscience News the Last 30 Days

These are the most viewed articles from all of Neuroscience News over the last 30 days and includes all categories such as neuroscience, AI, psychology, neurology, robotics and neurotech.

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A combination of personality traits and childhood circumstances account for why some older people experience loneliness more than others. Lonely adults over 50 were 1.24 times more likely to have rarely, or never, had comfortable friendships during childhood, and 1.34 times more likely to have had poor relationships with their mothers as children.
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Transplanting fecal microbiota from young mice to older mice reversed hallmark signs of aging in the gut, brains, and eyes. Transplanting the fecal microbiota from old to young mice had the reverse effect, inducing inflammation in the brain and depleting a key protein associated with healthy vision.