Tau

This shows a brain with tau deposits marked

Disrupted sleep in one’s 50s, 60s raises risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Sleep disruptions during middle age may be a potential biomarker for developing Alzheimer's disease later in life. Researchers found those who experienced sleep problems in their 40s and 50s had more amyloid beta accumulation in their brains later in life. Those whose sleep problems started in their 50s and 60s had increased levels of tau. Additionally, higher levels of tau were discovered in the brains of those who lacked synchronized brain waves associated with a good night's sleep.... Read More...
This shows a virus like protein structure

Memory Preserver: Researchers Develop Vaccine That Could Protect Against Alzheimer’s

Researchers have engineered a vaccine using virus-like particles that target Tau tangles in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Following the administration of the vaccine, the mice developed antibodies that cleared tau proteins, with the response lasting for a month. The mice also showed improvements in memory based tests and had less brain shrinkage than their peers who did not receive the vaccine. This suggests the vaccine prevented apoptosis. Researchers hope to move the vaccine to human clinical trials in the future.... Read More...
This shows someone erasing a drawing of a brain

Brain changes linked with Alzheimer’s up to 30 years before symptoms appear

Researchers have identified average levels of biological and anatomical brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease over thirty years before symptoms appear. In those with genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's, researchers found changes in cognitive performance up to 15 years before becoming symptomatic. Changes in Tau levels in the cerebral spinal fluid appeared up to 34 years before dementia symptoms occurred, and physical changes to the medial temporal lobe were apparent up to 9 years before cognitive impairment was apparent.... Read More...
This shows brain slices from a mouse

Why visual stimulation may work in fight against Alzheimer’s: Mouse study

Inducing gamma oscillations with visual stimulation via a process known as gamma entrainment using sensory stimuli, or GENUS, was shown to reduce amyloid plaques and phosphorylated tau in mouse models of dementia. Providing GENUS daily during the early stages of neurodegeneration helps preserve neural and synaptic density across multiple brain areas and improves cognitive performance for learning and spatial memory tasks.... Read More...