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Green Tea Steeped in Bottled Water Increases Antioxidants

Summary: Researchers report a boost in healthy antioxidants for green tea brewed with bottled, as opposed to tap, water.

Source: Cornell University.

Here’s to sipping a cupful of health: Green tea steeped in bottled water has a more bitter taste, but it has more antioxidants than tea brewed using tap water, according to new Cornell food science research published Jan. 3 in Nutrients.

In tests conducted at Cornell’s Sensory Evaluation Center, consumers liked green tea brewed using tap water more than using bottled water, because it produced a sweeter taste. “But, when steeped in bottled water, the green tea contained about double the amount of the antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) – which makes it more bitter than tea brewed with tap water,” said Robin Dando, Cornell associate professor of food science.

“If you’re drinking green tea for its health properties, you should be using bottled water,” Dando said. “If you’re drinking tea for taste, tap water is better.”

A panel of more than 100 consumers could not taste the difference between black tea brewed with either tap or bottled water.

green tea

In tests conducted at Cornell’s Sensory Evaluation Center, consumers liked green tea brewed using tap water more than using bottled water, because it produced a sweeter taste. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

“The average consumer for black tea isn’t able to tell the difference. Whether it was tap water or bottled water, the taste differences are too subtle,” said Melanie Franks, MPS ’18, the study’s lead author. Franks is a tea specialist who once taught chefs at the International Culinary Institute (formerly known as the French Culinary Institute, founded by the late Julia Child).

Dando believes the normal, everyday minerals in tap water – such as calcium, iron, magnesium, sodium and copper – are the products that result in lower levels of EGCG in green tea.

“Bottled water – where calcium or magnesium have been filtered out and where the iron concentration is brought down a notch – is able to extract the EGCG more efficiently,” said Dando. “With purer water, you get more health benefits out of the tea.”

About this neuroscience research article

Funding: Cornell funded the research.

Source:Cornell University
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: The research paper “The Influence of Water Composition on Flavor and Nutrient Extraction in Green and Black Tea” is available to download for free via the Cornell University website.

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Cornell University”Green Tea Steeped in Bottled Water Increases Antioxidants.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 15 January 2019.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/green-tea-water-antioxidants-10557/>.
Cornell University(2019, January 15). Green Tea Steeped in Bottled Water Increases Antioxidants. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved January 15, 2019 from http://neurosciencenews.com/green-tea-water-antioxidants-10557/
Cornell University”Green Tea Steeped in Bottled Water Increases Antioxidants.” http://neurosciencenews.com/green-tea-water-antioxidants-10557/ (accessed January 15, 2019).
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