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Our Ability to Focus on One Voice in Crowds Is Triggered by Voice Pitch

Summary: Imperial College London researchers have identified a group of neurons implicated in selective attention.

Source: Imperial College London.

Scientists have discovered that a group of neurons in the brain’s auditory stem help us to tune into specific conversations in a crowded room.

In order to focus on a particular conversation, listeners need to be able to focus on the voice of the speaker they wish to listen to. This process is called “selective attention” and it has been long known by researchers that it happens in the part of the brain called the auditory cortex, which processes speech information.

Selective attention helps the brain to modulate sound information and to prioritise information over the background noise, such as focusing on one conversation above all others in a crowded room. However, what triggers selective attention in the auditory cortex has been debated by scientists.

In a study published today in the journal eLife, the researchers from Imperial College London write how they investigated the structures downstream of the auditory cortex. In particular, they looked at the contribution that the auditory brainstem, which sits below the auditory cortex, makes to the selective attention process.

The experiment

The researchers set up non-invasive experiments with 14 participants who listened to two competing conversations. Electrodes were fitted to the participants’ heads and connected to a computer, which relayed the brain readings in the auditory brain stem. Algorithms devised by the team then decoded the information gathered by the electrodes.

When the participants chose to focus on one conversation above the other, neurons in the auditory brainstem responded more to the pitch of the voice that they listened to rather than to the pitch of the voice that they ignored. This suggests that an important aspect of selective attention occurs in the auditory brainstem and the neural signal is then relayed to the auditory cortex, where higher level processing of auditory information occurs.

Pitch is the key

Dr Tobias Reichenbach, the lead author from the Department of Bioengineering, said: “Humans excel at selectively listening to a target speaker when there are a lot of background noises, such as many competing voices. In this din of chatter the auditory cortex switches into action and with laser focus, processes information that enables us to zone in on one conversation. But how these selective process works have been debated.

“Now, our study is showing us that the pitch of the speaker’s voice we want to focus on is an important cue that is used in the auditory brainstem to focus on a target speaker. This helps us to concentrate on a voice while filtering out all the background noise.”

Implications for hearing

The team suggests that their discovery may hold the key to explaining why some people, who do not have hearing problems in the inner ear, still find it difficult to keep track of conversations in large crowds. It could be that the neurons in their auditory brainstem, associated with receiving pitch signals, are not properly activated.

Improving speech recognition technologies

The researchers say their discovery may also help engineers to refine speech recognition technologies such as automated answering machine systems and speech recognition technologies. Currently, these technologies do not function at their optimum level when there is a lot of background noise. The team suggests that if the technology could focus on the pitch of the user’s voice, then it may help to make the speech recognition process more accurate in environments with a lot of noise.

Next steps

Now that the researchers have discovered that voice pitch causes a response in the auditory brain stem they want to refine their experiments further. The next stage will involve non-invasive experiments with participants who will listen to several conversations at once so that the team can determine how selective attention works in more complex environments.

Image shows people chatting.

Selective attention helps the brain to modulate sound information and to prioritise information over the background noise, such as focusing on one conversation above all others in a crowded room. NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the Imperial College London news release.

Understanding this process in more detail could, for example, help engineers to build better hearing aids that are more adept at filtering out background noise for users, which is currently a challenge for those with hearing impairments in noisy places.

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Colin Smith – Imperial College London
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the Imperial College London news release.
Original Research: Full open access research for “The human auditory brainstem response to running speech reveals a subcortical mechanism for selective attention” by Antonio Elia Forte, Octave Etard, and Tobias Reichenbach Is a corresponding author in eLife. Published online October 10 2017 doi:10.7554/eLife.27203

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Imperial College London “Our Ability to Focus on One Voice in Crowds Is Triggered by Voice Pitch.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 10 October 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/voice-pitch-focus-7705/>.
Imperial College London (2017, October 10). Our Ability to Focus on One Voice in Crowds Is Triggered by Voice Pitch. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved October 10, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/voice-pitch-focus-7705/
Imperial College London “Our Ability to Focus on One Voice in Crowds Is Triggered by Voice Pitch.” http://neurosciencenews.com/voice-pitch-focus-7705/ (accessed October 10, 2017).

Abstract

The human auditory brainstem response to running speech reveals a subcortical mechanism for selective attention

Humans excel at selectively listening to a target speaker in background noise such as competing voices. While the encoding of speech in the auditory cortex is modulated by selective attention, it remains debated whether such modulation occurs already in subcortical auditory structures. Investigating the contribution of the human brainstem to attention has, in particular, been hindered by the tiny amplitude of the brainstem response. Its measurement normally requires a large number of repetitions of the same short sound stimuli, which may lead to a loss of attention and to neural adaptation. Here we develop a mathematical method to measure the auditory brainstem response to running speech, an acoustic stimulus that does not repeat and that has a high ecological validity. We employ this method to assess the brainstem’s activity when a subject listens to one of two competing speakers, and show that the brainstem response is consistently modulated by attention.

“The human auditory brainstem response to running speech reveals a subcortical mechanism for selective attention” by Antonio Elia Forte, Octave Etard, and Tobias Reichenbach Is a corresponding author in eLife. Published online October 10 2017 doi:10.7554/eLife.27203

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