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Newly Discovered Neural Pathway Has Implications For Schizophrenia Treatment

Summary: Researchers have discovered a new signaling pathway that connects NMDAR and alpha 7 acetylcholine nicotinic receptors, both implicated in memory and learning. Findings could help develop new treatments for schizophrenia.

Source: Tufts.

Astrocytes regulate intensity of neuronal signals linked to learning and memory by sensing wakefulness.

Neuroscientists at Tufts University School of Medicine have discovered a new signaling pathway that directly connects two major receptors in the brain associated with learning and memory — the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR) – which has significance for current efforts to develop drugs to treat schizophrenia. These findings demonstrate that astrocytes, a type of non-neuronal (or glial) cell once thought to have little part in brain information processing but now known to play important roles, are the key element that functionally links these two receptors.

The study, “Septal cholinergic neuromodulation tunes the astrocyte-dependent gating of hippocampal NMDA receptors to wakefulness,” is published in Neuron, May 4, 2017, online in advance of final publication.

“The NMDAR is the most investigated receptor in neuroscience because it is essential to synaptic plasticity, which is instrumental in establishing and remodeling brain circuitry and is thought to be the cellular foundation of learning and memory,” said Thomas Papouin, Ph.D., research assistant professor at Tufts School of Medicine and lead author of the study. “The NMDAR is known to be activated by two chemicals: glutamate, which is supplied by neurons, and D-serine, which is supplied by astrocytes. While most research is focused on the role that neurons play in activating the NMDAR via glutamate, we focused on the role played by astrocytes through the release of D-serine.”

Using in vitro and in vivo approaches in mice, the Tufts scientists found that astrocytes adjust their release of D-serine according to the degree of wakefulness of the mice. The astrocytes directly monitor wakefulness via the a7nAChR by sensing the level of ambient acetylcholine, a neuromodulator released in human and rodent brains during wakefulness. The more active the mice, the more D-serine is released by astrocytes, which allows a more robust activation of NMDARs. This was true even if researchers stimulated activity during times of day when mice are normally quiet.

“Astrocytes act like the dimmer control of a light,” Papouin said. “When the neuronal switch goes on, and glutamate is released, the setting of the astrocytic D-serine ‘dimmer’ determines the intensity of the NMDAR signal. During wakefulness, this dimmer is set on high – astrocytes provide a lot of D-serine — and this allows for a strong NMDAR signal. But during sleep or inactivity, it is set on low, allowing for a weaker signal.”

A New Framework for Treating Schizophrenia

The study offers a new functional framework for treating schizophrenia and opens fresh avenues for therapeutics and innovations in glial biology.

“This is an exciting finding with direct relevance to development of new treatments for schizophrenia, which is characterized by low levels of D-serine and diminished NMDAR as well as a major loss of cholinergic function. Efforts to develop pharmaceuticals to address these deficits have so far been unsuccessful, but in our study we were able to enhance NMDAR function via D-serine by stimulating a7nAChRs with a drug that has been part of recent stage 3 clinical trials for schizophrenia,” said Philip G. Haydon, Ph.D., corresponding author on the paper, the Annetta and Gustav Grisard professor and chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Tufts School of Medicine, and a member of the neuroscience program faculty at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts. “This suggests that cholinergic drugs now under development for schizophrenia work through this newly discovered astrocytic pathway.”

Image shows astrocytes and neurons.

Research from Tufts University in the journal Neuron reports a new signaling pathway that directly connects major brain receptors associated with learning and memory. Astrocytes (fluorescing green cells above) are the key element that links the receptors. Neurons are red. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Thomas Papouin.

The study is the latest work from the Haydon group at Tufts, which focuses on astrocytes and the role they play in regulating synaptic transmission and neuronal circuits and in controlling behavior and disorders of the nervous system.

Seventeen years ago, the group introduced the “tripartite-synapse,” the first concept to acknowledge the role of astrocytes in the integration and processing of information at synapses. “In this paper we build on that concept to update our view of the role of astrocytes in computing information about the brain,” said Haydon. “Based on these findings and evidence recently published by others, we propose a new concept of ‘contextual guidance’ which incorporates how astrocytes tune synaptic activity to relevant global contexts by sensing the remote activity of neuromodulators such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine.”

About this neuroscience research article

Additional authors on the paper are Tufts’ Jaclyn Dunphy and Michaela Tolman, doctoral candidates in the neuroscience program at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, and Kelly T. Dineley, associate professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston.

Funding: This work was supported by the Philippe Foundation Inc.; Human Frontier Science Program (LT000010/2013); and the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health (MH106208, NS037585, NS061764, and AA020183). Haydon is the founder of GliaCure, a privately held biotechnology company with which Tufts University holds exclusive licensing arrangements.

Source: Siobhan Gallagher – Tufts
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Thomas Papouin.
Original Research: Abstract for “Septal Cholinergic Neuromodulation Tunes the Astrocyte-Dependent Gating of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors to Wakefulness” by Thomas Papouin, Jaclyn M. Dunphy, Michaela Tolman, Kelly T. Dineley, and Philip G. Haydon in Neuron. Published online April 12 2017 doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.04.021

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Tufts “Newly Discovered Neural Pathway Has Implications For Schizophrenia Treatment.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 4 May 2017.
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Tufts (2017, May 4). Newly Discovered Neural Pathway Has Implications For Schizophrenia Treatment. NeuroscienceNew. Retrieved May 4, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/schizophrenia-astrocytes-learning-6589/
Tufts “Newly Discovered Neural Pathway Has Implications For Schizophrenia Treatment.” http://neurosciencenews.com/schizophrenia-astrocytes-learning-6589/ (accessed May 4, 2017).

Abstract

Septal Cholinergic Neuromodulation Tunes the Astrocyte-Dependent Gating of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors to Wakefulness

Highlights
•D-serine availability at hippocampal synapses fluctuates with wakefulness
•Septal cholinergic signaling determines D-serine levels, via α7nAChRs
•α7nAChRs directly located on astrocytes drive the vesicular release of D-serine
•An α7nAChR modulator used in schizophrenia clinical trials augments NMDAR gating

Summary
The activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is controlled by a glutamate-binding site and a distinct, independently regulated, co-agonist-binding site. In most brain regions, the NMDAR co-agonist is the astrocyte-derived gliotransmitter D-serine. We found that D-serine levels oscillate in mouse hippocampus as a function of wakefulness, in vitro and in vivo. This causes a full saturation of the NMDAR co-agonist site in the dark (active) phase that dissipates to sub-saturating levels during the light (sleep) phase, and influences learning performance throughout the day. We demonstrate that hippocampal astrocytes sense the wakefulness-dependent activity of septal cholinergic fibers through the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), whose activation drives D-serine release. We conclude that astrocytes tune the gating of synaptic NMDARs to the vigilance state and demonstrate that this is directly relevant to schizophrenia, a disorder characterized by NMDAR and cholinergic hypofunctions. Indeed, bypassing cholinergic activity with a clinically tested α7nAChR agonist successfully enhances NMDAR activation.

“Septal Cholinergic Neuromodulation Tunes the Astrocyte-Dependent Gating of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors to Wakefulness” by Thomas Papouin, Jaclyn M. Dunphy, Michaela Tolman, Kelly T. Dineley, and Philip G. Haydon in Neuron. Published online April 12 2017 doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.04.021

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