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From Healthcare to Warfare: How to Regulate Brain Technology

Summary: University of Basel bioethicists have outlined a new biosecurity framework for neurotechnology. They call for regulations to protect the mental privacy and integrity of those the technologies are used on.

Source: University of Basel.

Ethicists from the University of Basel have outlined a new biosecurity framework specific to neurotechnology. While the researchers declare an outright ban of dual-use technology ethically unjustified, they call for regulations aimed at protecting the mental privacy and integrity of humans. The journal Neuron has published the study.

The term “dual-use” refers to technology that can be used for both beneficial (i.e., medical) and harmful (i.e., military of terroristic) aims. Until recently, most dual-use technology emerged especially in virology and bacteriology. In the last years, however, military-funded research has entered the domain of neuroscience and neurotechnology.

This has resulted in a rapid growth in brain technology prototypes aimed at modulating the emotions, cognition, and behavior of soldiers. These include neurotechnological applications for deception detection and interrogation as well as brain-computer interfaces for military purposes.

Neurotechnology and ethical issues

This military research has raised concern about the risks associated with the weaponization of neurotechnology, sparking a debate about controversial questions: Is it legitimate to conduct military research on brain technology? And how should policy-makers regulate dual-use neurotechnology?

Three bioethicists from the University of Basel have now argue in a study that an outright ban on military neurotechnology would not be ethically justified. According to the study, a ban could delay the development of new technologies for people in need such as Alzheimer’s patients or people with spinal injuries. A ban could also push military experimentation underground.

Outline for biosecurity framework

With the aging of the world population and the consequent prevalence of brain disorders, they argue, there is an increasing need for investment in neurotechnological innovation.

a man in an EEG cap

Is it legitimate to conduct military research on neurotechnology? NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Ars Electronica.

For this reason, they have developed a framework concept for biosafety that is specifically geared to neurotechnology. It proposes neuro-specific regulatory approaches as well as a code of conduct for military research and calls for awareness-raising measures in the scientific community.

“Our framework postulates the development of regulations and ethical guidelines aimed at protecting the mental dimension of individuals and groups, especially their mental privacy and integrity,ยป says first author Marcello Ienca from the Institute for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Basel. In addition, the researchers call for raising awareness and starting a debate about these controversial issues.

About this neuroscience research article

Funding: The research was supported, in part, by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (R01MH099128) and by a Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative grant (SFARI 294388).

Source: Olivia Poisson – University of Basel
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Ars Electronica.
Original Research: Abstract for “From Healthcare to Warfare and Reverse: How Should We Regulate Dual-Use Neurotechnology?” by Marcello Ienca, Fabrice Jotterand, and Bernice S. Elger in Neuron. Published online January 18 2018 doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.12.017

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
University of Basel “From Healthcare to Warfare: How to Regulate Brain Technology.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 18 January 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/neurotechnology-regulation-8337/>.
University of Basel (2018, January 18). From Healthcare to Warfare: How to Regulate Brain Technology. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved January 18, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/neurotechnology-regulation-8337/
University of Basel “From Healthcare to Warfare: How to Regulate Brain Technology.” http://neurosciencenews.com/neurotechnology-regulation-8337/ (accessed January 18, 2018).

Abstract

From Healthcare to Warfare and Reverse: How Should We Regulate Dual-Use Neurotechnology?

Recent advances in military-funded neurotechnology and novel opportunities for misusing neurodevices show that the problem of dual use is inherent to neuroscience. This paper discusses how the neuroscience community should respond to these dilemmas and delineates a neuroscience-specific biosecurity framework. This neurosecurity framework involves calibrated regulation, (neuro)ethical guidelines, and awareness-raising activities within the scientific community.

“From Healthcare to Warfare and Reverse: How Should We Regulate Dual-Use Neurotechnology?” by Marcello Ienca, Fabrice Jotterand, and Bernice S. Elger in Neuron. Published online January 18 2018 doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.12.017

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