The image shows the MS-OISI images of the cortical surface. The caption best explains the image.

Shedding New Light on Infant Brain Development

Researchers find the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain. The findings could change the way researchers study brain development in infants and children.
The FMRI image shows regions of activation including primary visual cortex (V1, BA17), extrastriate visual cortex and lateral geniculate body.

Pioneering Research Helps to Unravel the Brain’s Vision Secrets

A new study has identified the two areas of the brain responsible for our perception of orientation and shape. Research found that the two neighbouring areas, known as human visual field maps, process the different types of visual information independently.
The image shows opera singers performing a scene from La Boheme .

Listeners Mindfulness Enhanced by Meditation Technique

New research explores how mindfulness meditation could enhance both musical engagement and performance. Additional research into mindfulness meditation could potentially lead to new treatment for mental illness and brain injuries.
Two brain images are shown side by side with Wernicke's area highlighted.

Research Reveals How the Human Brain Adapts to Injury

Scientists used a new combination of neural imaging methods to discover how the human brain adapts to injury. The research shows that when one brain area loses functionality, a back-up team of secondary brain areas immediately activates, replacing not only the unavailable area but also its confederates.
A brain image is next to a drawing of a 1918 brain map.

Researchers Create a Universal Map of Vision in the Human Brain

Researchers create a map of vision in the brain based upon an individual's brain structure, even for people who cannot see. Their result can, among other things, guide efforts to restore vision using a neural prosthesis that stimulates the surface of the brain.
anxiety-patients-response-visual-processing-brain

Predicting How Patients Respond to Therapy

A new study led by MIT neuroscientists has found that brain scans of patients with social anxiety disorder can help predict whether they will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy.