A password will be e-mailed to you.

First US Nonhuman Primate Gene Editing Study Successful

Summary: Researchers show CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology can be effectively used in rhesus monkey embryos.

Source: Michigan State University.

Mice have been and will continue to be good base models for human medicinal advances. However, their size and some of their physiological differences leave them lacking in important areas of human medicine, including neurological and reproductive research.

In a study led by Michigan State University, scientists have shown that gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9 technology can be quite effective in rhesus monkey embryos ­– the first time this has been demonstrated in the U.S.

The results, published in the current issue of Human Molecular Genetics, open the door for pursuing gene editing in nonhuman primates as models for new therapies, including pharmacological, gene- and stem cell-based therapies, said Keith Latham, MSU animal science professor and lead author of the study.

“Our paper is the first in the U.S. to publish on the use of this technology in nonhuman primate embryos,” he said. “Using nonhuman primate embryos is important because the closer we can approximate the human condition in the animal model, the better the chances of developing successful treatments as well as limiting risks that may be encountered in clinical trials.”

While mice are mammals, they bear litters rather than individual offspring. Their anatomy and physiology differ in many respects from humans. While many advances in understanding diseases have been made first using mouse models, making the leap from a successful mouse study to clinical trials can be difficult or impossible for some areas of research.

“If scientists want to test drugs for dementia, Alzheimer’s or autism, ideal models would react similarly to humans in regards to the reduction of symptoms, outbreak of side effects, such as enduring the same lesions as humans do, or exhibiting similar behavioral characteristics,” said Latham, who’s with the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and an MSU AgBioResearch scientist. “Nonhuman primates are much better models for such diseases. And in terms of some surgical procedures, implants, developing prosthetics, or other therapies, nonhuman primates can prove better suited than rodents.”

CRISPR has opened the door to do gene editing in many species other than mice. Developing this technology in nonhuman primates in the U.S. would allow more scientists in this country to incorporate these models into their research, he added.

The advances will allow scientists to move forward and tackle some of the technical barriers related to the research. Other issues that may be later resolved are the commitment to increased costs and longer waiting times when using nonhuman primates.

Image shows a DNA strand.

CRISPR has opened the door to do gene editing in many species other than mice. Developing this technology in nonhuman primates in the U.S. would allow more scientists in this country to incorporate these models into their research. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only.

Fruit flies, often used in genetic studies, reproduce in two weeks. Rodents, with pre-disposed genetic characteristics, can be easily ordered and shipped to laboratories within days. Committing to raising nonhuman primates can cost around $15,000 and can take as long as 4-6 years to have a mature monkey with the desired genetic characteristics.

The high-efficiency of gene editing that scientists are now able to achieve makes it worth the cost and the wait, Latham said.

To conduct the research, Latham partnered with the California National Primate Research Center, where the monkey embryos were produced, in collaboration with his co-investigator Dr. Catherine VandeVoort, an expert in nonhuman primate reproduction. Dr. Daniel Bauer, at Harvard Medical School, Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute also collaborated on the study.

The resources offered by the CNPRC were crucial for this work, Latham said.

“Extreme amounts of care go into maintaining the well-being of the monkeys,” he said. “They follow strict protocols to ensure this is a priority. So being able to conduct the science here at Michigan State while partnering with the center is the best combination of science and animal welfare.”

About this neuroscience research article

Additional MSU scientists contributing to the study include Uros Midic, Kailey Vincent and Benjamin Goheen.

Funding: This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, MSU AgBioResearch, MSU, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, American Society of Hematology, Charles H. Hood Foundation and Cooley’s Anemia Foundation.

Source: Layne Cameron – Michigan State University
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Abstract for “Quantitative assessment of timing, efficiency, specificity, and genetic mosaicism of CRISPR/Cas9 mediated gene editing of hemoglobin beta gene in rhesus monkey embryos” by Uros Midic, Pei-hsuan Hung, Kailey A Vincent, Benjamin Goheen, Patrick G. Schupp, Diane D. Chen, Daniel E. Bauer, Catherine A VandeVoort, and Keith E. Latham in Human Molecular Genetics. Published online April 21 2017 doi:10.1093/hmg/ddx154

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Michigan State University “First US Nonhuman Primate Gene Editing Study Successful.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 1 May 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/crispr-cas9-nonhuman-primate-6554/>.
Michigan State University (2017, May 1). First US Nonhuman Primate Gene Editing Study Successful. NeuroscienceNew. Retrieved May 1, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/crispr-cas9-nonhuman-primate-6554/
Michigan State University “First US Nonhuman Primate Gene Editing Study Successful.” http://neurosciencenews.com/crispr-cas9-nonhuman-primate-6554/ (accessed May 1, 2017).

Abstract

Quantitative assessment of timing, efficiency, specificity, and genetic mosaicism of CRISPR/Cas9 mediated gene editing of hemoglobin beta gene in rhesus monkey embryos

Gene editing technologies offer new options for developing novel biomedical research models and for gene and stem cell based therapies. However, applications in many species demand high efficiencies, specificity, and a thorough understanding of likely editing outcomes. To date, overall efficiencies, rates of off-targeting, and degree of genetic mosaicism have not been well-characterized for most species, limiting our ability to optimize methods. As a model gene for measuring these parameters of CRISPR/Cas9 application in a primate species (rhesus monkey), we selected the β-hemoglobin gene (HBB), which also has high relevance to potential application of gene editing and stem-cell technologies for treating human disease. Our data demonstrate an ability to achieve a high efficiency of gene editing in rhesus monkey zygotes, with no detected off-target effects at selected off-target loci. Considerable genetic mosaicism and variation in the fraction of embryonic cells bearing targeted alleles are observed, and the timing of editing events is revealed using a new model. The use of Cas9-WT protein combined with optimized concentrations of sgRNAs are two likely areas for further refinement to enhance efficiency while limiting unfavorable outcomes that can be exceedingly costly for application of gene editing in primate species.

“Quantitative assessment of timing, efficiency, specificity, and genetic mosaicism of CRISPR/Cas9 mediated gene editing of hemoglobin beta gene in rhesus monkey embryos” by Uros Midic, Pei-hsuan Hung, Kailey A Vincent, Benjamin Goheen, Patrick G. Schupp, Diane D. Chen, Daniel E. Bauer, Catherine A VandeVoort, and Keith E. Latham in Human Molecular Genetics. Published online April 21 2017 doi:10.1093/hmg/ddx154

Feel free to share this Neuroscience News.
Join our Newsletter
Sign up to receive the latest neuroscience headlines and summaries sent to your email daily from NeuroscienceNews.com
We hate spam. Your email address will not be sold or shared with anyone else.
No more articles