A password will be e-mailed to you.

Brains of One Handed People Suggest New Organization Theory

Summary: A new study into people born with one hand could shake up understanding of how the brain organizes itself.

Source: Cell Press.

In people born with one hand, the brain region that would normally light up with that missing hand’s activity lights up instead with the activity of other body parts–including the arm, foot, and mouth–that fill in for the hand’s lost function. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on April 20 say that the discovery could shake up scientists’ fundamental understanding of how the brain is organized.

“Scientifically, I think one way to put our results in context is to say, what if the hand area is not the hand area per se, but just the part of the brain in charge of function ‘normally’ carried by that hand?” says Tamar Makin of University College London, United Kingdom.

“In intact participants, all this is carried by the non-dominant hand,” she continues. “But the fact that we see such a striking different representation in that area in congenital one-handers might suggest that this is not actually the hand area. If true, this means we’ve been misinterpreting brain organization based on body part, rather than based on function. It’s kind of mind blowing for me to think we could have been getting this wrong for so long. The implications, if this interpretation is correct, are massive.”

But, she cautions, it’s still just a working theory at this point.

Scientists have long known that different parts of the brain control different body parts. In the new study, Makin and her colleagues, including Avital Hahamy at Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science, set out to explore what happens to brain organization in people for whom a body part never existed.

The researchers studied 17 people who lacked a hand from birth along with 24 matched, two-handed controls. Each participant was video recorded while completing five everyday tasks, such as wrapping a present or handling money, to see how he or she went about it. Participants were also asked to move various parts of their bodies while their brains were scanned using functional MRI (fMRI).

Image shows a person with one hand checking their wallet.

The researchers studied 17 people who lacked a hand from birth along with 24 matched, two-handed controls. Each participant was video recorded while completing five everyday tasks, such as wrapping a present or handling money, to see how he or she went about it. Participants were also asked to move various parts of their bodies while their brains were scanned using functional MRI (fMRI). NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Hahamy et al.

“We found that the traditional hand area”–which, Makin notes, takes up a rather sizable portion of the brain–“gets used up by a multitude of body parts in congenital one-handers. Interestingly, these body parts that get to benefit from increased representation in the freed-up brain territory are those used by the one-handers in daily life to substitute for their missing-hand function–say when having to open a bottle of water.”

Whether Makin’s theory on brain organization corresponding to function instead of body parts pans out or not, the findings reveal remarkable brain plasticity. Her hope is to find a way to encourage the brain to represent and control artificial body parts, such as a prosthetic arm, using the brain area that would have controlled the missing hand.

“If we, as neuroscientists, could harness this process, we could provide a really powerful tool to better healthcare and society,” Makin says. “Unfortunately, this process is currently quite restricted in the brains of adults. But by learning how this occurs spontaneously in one-handers, we can get a handle on what we might be able to achieve.”

About this neuroscience research article

Funding: This research was financially supported by the Cogito Foundation; the Wellcome Trust and the Royal Society, an Israeli Presidential Bursary for outstanding PhD students in brain research, a Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds travel grant; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

Source: Joseph Caputo – Cell Press
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Hahamy et al.
Original Research: Full open access research for “Representation of Multiple Body Parts in the Missing-Hand Territory of Congenital One-Handers” by Avital Hahamy, Scott N. Macdonald, Fiona van den Heiligenberg, Paullina Kieliba, Uzay Emir, Rafael Malach, Heidi Johansen-Berg, Peter Brugger, Jody C. Culham, and Tamar R. Makin in Current Biology. Published online April 20 2017 doi:10.1016/j.cub.2017.03.053

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Cell Press “Brains of One Handed People Suggest New Organization Theory: Brain Views Immoral Acts As If They Are Impossible.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 20 April 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/one-hand-brain-organization-6457/>.
Cell Press (2017, April 20). Brains of One Handed People Suggest New Organization Theory: Brain Views Immoral Acts As If They Are Impossible. NeuroscienceNew. Retrieved April 20, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/one-hand-brain-organization-6457/
Cell Press “Brains of One Handed People Suggest New Organization Theory: Brain Views Immoral Acts As If They Are Impossible.” http://neurosciencenews.com/one-hand-brain-organization-6457/ (accessed April 20, 2017).

Abstract

Representation of Multiple Body Parts in the Missing-Hand Territory of Congenital One-Handers

Highlights
•Compensatory behavior in one-handers involves utilization of multiple body parts
•Multiple body parts benefit from increased representation in the missing-hand area
•The missing-hand area showed reduced connectional selectivity (lower GABA levels)

Summary
Individuals born without one hand (congenital one-handers) provide a unique model for understanding the relationship between focal reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex and everyday behavior. We previously reported that the missing hand’s territory of one-handers becomes utilized by its cortical neighbor (residual arm representation), depending on residual arm usage in daily life to substitute for the missing hand’s function. However, the repertoire of compensatory behaviors may involve utilization of other body parts that do not cortically neighbor the hand territory. Accordingly, the pattern of brain reorganization may be more extensive. Here we studied unconstrained compensatory strategies under ecological conditions in one-handers, as well as changes in activation, connectivity, and neurochemical profile in their missing hand’s cortical territory. We found that compensatory behaviors in one-handers involved multiple body parts (residual arm, lips, and feet). This diversified compensatory profile was associated with large-scale cortical reorganization, regardless of cortical proximity to the hand territory. Representations of those body parts used to substitute hand function all mapped onto the cortical territory of the missing hand, as evidenced by task-based and resting-state fMRI. The missing-hand territory also exhibited reduced GABA levels, suggesting a reduction in connectional selectivity to enable the expression of diverse cortical inputs. Because the same body parts used for compensatory purposes are those showing increased representation in the missing hand’s territory, we suggest that the typical hand territory may not necessarily represent the hand per se, but rather any other body part that shares the functionality of the missing hand.

“Representation of Multiple Body Parts in the Missing-Hand Territory of Congenital One-Handers” by Avital Hahamy, Scott N. Macdonald, Fiona van den Heiligenberg, Paullina Kieliba, Uzay Emir, Rafael Malach, Heidi Johansen-Berg, Peter Brugger, Jody C. Culham, and Tamar R. Makin in Current Biology. Published online April 20 2017 doi:10.1016/j.cub.2017.03.053

Feel free to share this Neuroscience News.
Join our Newsletter
Sign up to receive the latest neuroscience headlines and summaries sent to your email daily from NeuroscienceNews.com
We hate spam. Your email address will not be sold or shared with anyone else.
No more articles