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Proton Pump Inhibitors For Digestive Problems Not Linked to Increased Dementia Risk

Summary: Despite the findings of some previous studies, new research finds proton pump inhibitors taken for digestive problems do not increase a person’s risk for developing dementia.

Source: AGS.

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines commonly prescribed to treat acid-related digestive problems, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (or GERD). As of 2011, up to 1 in 5 older adults reported using a PPI. Although healthcare practitioners have long believed that PPIs are safe, recent studies have linked PPIs to potential risks, including fractures and kidney disease. Some studies also have linked PPIs to an increased risk for dementia among older adults. However, several experts have suggested that these studies may not correctly measure the connection.

In a new research article published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, scientists were able to conclude that developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (the most common form of dementia) did not appear to be linked to taking PPIs.

The researchers reviewed information from the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, which included 3,484 adults aged 65 and older. Participants did not have dementia at the beginning of the study and were followed for an average of about 7.5 years.

Researchers tested participants for dementia at the beginning of the study and then every two years. Those who tested positive were given complete evaluations to measure their abilities to think and make decisions. Researchers gave the participants who were diagnosed with dementia follow-up tests to confirm the diagnosis.

Researchers tested participants for dementia at the beginning of the study and then every two years. Those who tested positive were given complete evaluations to measure their abilities to think and make decisions. Researchers gave the participants who were diagnosed with dementia follow-up tests to confirm the diagnosis. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

Researchers used information from the ACT study to learn how many participants took PPIs and for how long. Overall, almost 24 percent of study participants developed dementia. Of these individuals, just 670 people developed possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease. While other safety concerns with long-term PPI use exist, the researchers conluded that results from this study suggest that dementia is not linked to taking a PPI.

About this neuroscience research article

Source: Daniel E. Trucil – AGS
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Full open access research for “Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Dementia Risk: Prospective Population-Based Study” by Shelly L. Gray PharmD, MS, Rod L. Walker MS, Sascha Dublin MD, PhD, Onchee Yu MS, Erin J. Aiello Bowles MPH, Melissa L. Anderson MS, Paul K. Crane MD, MPH, and Eric B. Larson MD, MPH in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Published online November 14 2017 doi:10.1111/jgs.15073

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
AGS “Proton Pump Inhibitors For Digestive Problems Not Linked to Increased Dementia Risk.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 22 November 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-ppis-8012/>.
AGS (2017, November 22). Proton Pump Inhibitors For Digestive Problems Not Linked to Increased Dementia Risk. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved November 22, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-ppis-8012/
AGS “Proton Pump Inhibitors For Digestive Problems Not Linked to Increased Dementia Risk.” http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-ppis-8012/ (accessed November 22, 2017).

Abstract

Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Dementia Risk: Prospective Population-Based Study

Objectives

To determine whether higher cumulative proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure is associated with greater dementia risk.

Design

Prospective population-based cohort study.

Setting

Kaiser Permanente Washington, an integrated healthcare delivery system in Seattle, Washington.

Participants

Individuals aged 65 and older without dementia at study entry (N = 3,484).

Measurements

Participants were screened for dementia every 2 years, and those who screened positive underwent extensive evaluation. Dementia outcomes were determined using standard diagnostic criteria. Time-varying PPI exposure was determined from computerized pharmacy data and consisted of total standardized daily doses (TSDDs) dispensed to an individual in the prior 10 years. We also assessed duration of use. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between PPI exposure and time to dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Results

Over a mean follow-up of 7.5 years, 827 participants (23.7%) developed dementia (670 with possible or probable AD). PPI exposure was not associated with risk of dementia (P = .66) or AD (P = .77). For dementia, the risk for specific levels of cumulative exposure compared to no use was: 365 TSDDs (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.65–1.18), 1,095 TSDDs (HR 0.99, CI 0.75–1.30) and 1,825 TSDDs (HR 1.13, CI 0.82–1.56). These TSDD levels represent approximately 1, 3 and 5 years of daily use respectively. Duration of PPI use was not associated with dementia outcomes either.

Conclusion

Proton pump inhibitor use was not associated with dementia risk, even for people with high cumulative exposure. Although there are other safety concerns with long-term PPI use, results from our study do not support that these medications should be avoided out of concern about dementia risk.

“Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Dementia Risk: Prospective Population-Based Study” by Shelly L. Gray PharmD, MS, Rod L. Walker MS, Sascha Dublin MD, PhD, Onchee Yu MS, Erin J. Aiello Bowles MPH, Melissa L. Anderson MS, Paul K. Crane MD, MPH, and Eric B. Larson MD, MPH in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Published online November 14 2017 doi:10.1111/jgs.15073

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