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Effects of Alcoholism on Brain’s Reward System May Be Different in Women Than Men

Summary: Researchers report the reward system in the brains of female alcoholics are larger than in women who are not addicted to alcohol. By contrast, this area is smaller in alcoholic men than non-alcoholic men.

Source: Mass General.

A collaborative study between researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has found evidence implying that alcoholism may have different effects on the reward system in the brains of women than it does in men.

In their paper published in Psychiatry Research Neuroimaging, the team reports that reward system structures are larger in alcoholic women than in nonalcoholic women, and their report confirmed earlier studies that found the same structures were smaller in alcoholic men than in nonalcoholic men. The study, which enrolled currently abstinent individuals with a history of long-term alcohol use disorder, also found a negative association between the length of sobriety and the size of the fluid-filled ventricles in the center of the brain, suggesting possible recovery of the overall brain from the effects of alcoholism

“Until now, little has been known about the volume of the reward regions in alcoholic women, since all previous studies have been done in men,” says co-author Gordon Harris, PhD, of the 3D Imaging Service and the Center for Morphometric Analysis in the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH. “Our findings suggest that it might be helpful to consider gender-specific approaches to treatment for alcoholism.”

The brain’s reward system is a group of structures – including the amygdala and the hippocampus – that reinforce beneficial experiences, are involved in memory and complex decision-making and have been implicated in the development of substance use disorders. Since there are known difference between the psychological and behavioral profiles of women and men with alcoholism – women tend toward having higher levels of anxiety, while men are more likely to exhibit anti-social characteristics – the current study was designed to investigate whether the alcoholism-associated reward system differences previously observed in men would also be seen in women.

The study enrolled 60 participants with histories of long-term alcoholism – 30 women and 30 men – and an equivalent group of nonalcoholic volunteers. The alcoholic participants had been abstinent for time periods ranging from four weeks to 38 years. Participants completed detailed medical histories and neuropsychological assessments with the BUSM researchers before having MRI brain scans at the Martinos Center that were analyzed both in terms of the total brain and of the structures in the reward network.

Image shows the reward system in the brain.

The brain’s reward system is a group of structures – including the amygdala and the hippocampus – that reinforce beneficial experiences, are involved in memory and complex decision-making and have been implicated in the development of substance use disorders. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only.

Replicating the results of earlier studies, the average sizes of reward region structures of alcoholic men were 4.1 percent smaller than those of nonalcoholic men, but the average sizes of the same structures were 4.4 percent larger in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic women. While factors such as the duration and intensity of heavy drinking appeared to reinforce these gender-specific effects, the research team notes that the current study cannot determine whether these differences preceded or resulted from the development of alcoholism. Among participants with alcoholism – both women and men – each year of sobriety was associated with a 1.8 percent decrease in the size of the ventricles, suggesting recovery from the damaging effects of alcoholism on the brain.

“We’re planning to take a more detailed look at the impact of factors such as the severity of drinking and the length of sobriety on specific brain structure, and hope to investigate whether the imaging differences seen in this and previous studies are associated with gender-based differences in motivational and emotional functions,” says co-author Marlene Oscar-Berman, PhD, a professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Anatomy & Neurobiology at BUSM.

About this neuroscience research article

Harris is a professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. Kayle Sawyer of Oscar-Berman’s BUSM team is lead and corresponding author of the Psychiatry Research Neuroimaging paper. Additional co-authors are Olivier Barthelemy, BUSM, and George Papadimitriou and Nikos Makris, MD, Martinos Center.

Funding: Support for the study includes National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism grants R01-AA07112 and K05-AA00219, Department of Veterans Affairs grant I01-CX000326 , National Institute on Aging/National Institute of Mental Health grant R01-AG042512, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health grant R21-AT008865; and National Center for Research Resources grant P41RR14075.

Source: Terri Ogan – Mass General
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Abstract for “Gender dimorphism of brain reward system volumes in alcoholism” by Kayle S. Sawyer, Marlene Oscar-Berman, Olivier J. Barthelemy, George M. Papadimitriou, Gordon J. Harris, and Nikos Makris in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging. Published online March 5 2017 doi:10.1016/j.pscychresns.2017.03.001

Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article
Mass General “Effects of Alcoholism on Brain’s Reward System May Be Different in Women Than Men.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 20 April 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/alcohol-reward-system-women-6461/>.
Mass General (2017, April 20). Effects of Alcoholism on Brain’s Reward System May Be Different in Women Than Mene. NeuroscienceNew. Retrieved April 20, 2017 from http://neurosciencenews.com/alcohol-reward-system-women-6461/
Mass General “Effects of Alcoholism on Brain’s Reward System May Be Different in Women Than Men.” http://neurosciencenews.com/alcohol-reward-system-women-6461/ (accessed April 20, 2017).

Abstract

Gender dimorphism of brain reward system volumes in alcoholism

The brain’s reward network has been reported to be smaller in alcoholic men compared to nonalcoholic men, but little is known about the volumes of reward regions in alcoholic women. Morphometric analyses were performed on magnetic resonance brain scans of 60 long-term chronic alcoholics (ALC; 30 men) and 60 nonalcoholic controls (NC; 29 men). We derived volumes of total brain, and cortical and subcortical reward-related structures including the dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), orbitofrontal, and cingulate cortices, and the temporal pole, insula, amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens septi (NAc), and ventral diencephalon (VDC). We examined the relationships of the volumetric findings to drinking history. Analyses revealed a significant gender interaction for the association between alcoholism and total reward network volumes, with ALC men having smaller reward volumes than NC men and ALC women having larger reward volumes than NC women. Analyses of a priori subregions revealed a similar pattern of reward volume differences with significant gender interactions for DLPFC and VDC. Overall, the volume of the cerebral ventricles in ALC participants was negatively associated with duration of abstinence, suggesting decline in atrophy with greater length of sobriety.

“Gender dimorphism of brain reward system volumes in alcoholism” by Kayle S. Sawyer, Marlene Oscar-Berman, Olivier J. Barthelemy, George M. Papadimitriou, Gordon J. Harris, and Nikos Makris in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging. Published online March 5 2017 doi:10.1016/j.pscychresns.2017.03.001

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